1997

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1997
Third Annual Trident Athletic Achievement Awards. The Dedication Awards. First for four years of outstanding varsity athletics: Nick Theodosis, basketball and Jennifer Cummings, softball. Three Sport awards: Jesus Quintinilla, football, soccer and track. Jenny Croghan, cross country, basketball and track Mad Dog award for outstanding competitive spirit: Marcell Jackson, basketball. Laura Strickland, water polo.

Senior Female Athlete of the Year: Corey Miller, water polo and swimming. After spending three years beating up boys in the SCCAL water polo league, Corey led the first ever officially SCCAL and CIF sanctioned SC girls water polo team, to the league title. She will be playing for Cal next year. Also nominated were Soji Howe, basketball; Ellen Sherrill, water polo, soccer and Bridgett Connerly, band (?)

Junior Female Athlete of the Year: Francine Lynch, soccer and track. SCCAL defensive player of the year in soccer for her hard work, lightning speed, knowledge of the game and aggressive play would be hard to count the number of spectacular plays, she made from her sweeper position. The heart and sole of the Card defense. She was always a force to be reckoned with. In track, her speed earned he the title of “fastest female sprinter at SCHS” as she left most opponents in the dust. Also nominated were Greta Hansen, tennis; Laura Beach, diving, Bonnie Salter, surfing and Shannon Griggs, soccer.

Sophomore Female Athlete of the Year: Diana Willis, water polo, basketball, swimming. Diana helped lead all three teams to the CCS playoffs. As a water polo player, she is one of the fiercest and most competitive there is. Also nominated were Adrian Cramer, water polo, basketball and swimming. Ella Harley, volleyball, basketball.

Freshman Female Athlete of the Year: Marie McCann, soccer and track. Has there ever been a freshman female soccer player with Marie’s skills, stamina and desire? She was outstanding at the halfback position as her first string ALL SCCAL selection would show. Also nominated were Liza Salter, surfing and Page Nutt, softball.

Senior Male Athlete of the Year: Wes Bare, soccer and baseball. Whether on the mound or in the opposing goalie box is an exceptional athlete. Also nominated were Nick Theodosis, basketball; Tyler Masamuri, football and track; Casey Nichols, water polo and Steve Kele, water polo, swimming.

Junior Male Athlete of the Year: Gabe Coren, tennis. Gabe went undefeated for the season with a 14-0 record. He won his second consecutive SCCAL individual singles title. He also ranked among the top players in the Boys’ 18 section of Nor Cal. Also nominated were Boris Quintanilla, wrestling; Ryan Deane, football and Stefan Woliczko, surfing.

Sophomore Male Athlete of the Year: Joey Perez, soccer. Exceptional striker with the ability to score from anywhere on the field. Helped lead the team to the SCCAL title. Aggressive and tenacious player and top scorer. Also nominated was Marcell Jackson, basketball.

Freshman Male Athlete of the Year: Tyler Williams, basketball. Made immediate impact at the varsity level. His quickness, court sense and shooting ability are outstanding and allow him to be extremely competitive on varsity. Also nominated were Isaac Wientraub, golf and Corry Atkins, water polo, swimming.

Yearbook. All of Spring sports came too early in the yearbook make up to write anything on each of the teams. Yearbooks are worked on during the school year and turned in small chunks at a time. Spring sports are due in early March, before much happens to write about in league play. Yearbook class usually goes into term three and four to allow a full staff to work on these pages, but this year the class ended term two leaving only one person and no photographers to finish the sports. (There are pictures for all the Spring sports, but no names or information)

1997
FOOTBALL Practice games: Stevenson 29-20, Carmel 21-28, Westmont 40-16, Menlo 13-34. Practice record 2-2. League: SLV 20-34, Harbor 0-28, Aptos 25-35, Monte Vista 41-21, Watsonville 14-48, Soquel 6-24. League record 1-5 for sixth place. Season record 3-7.

Yearbook. Roster: Clay Tol, Sam Matisius, Robert Ames, Billy Logan, George Urban, Matt Anderson, Eric Hansman, Brandon Williams, Chris George, Nick Miller, Ben Kennedy, Bracken Christopher, John Peterson, Pedro Ibarra, Sean Morris John Howell, Jeff Truhitte, Javier Fitzgerald Santana, Sule Edmonds, Travis Rowland, John Howard, Nick Robinson, Kenyatte Edmonds, Daniel Cortez, Paul Newman, Jason Cardoza, Tyrell Newton, Marcos Olivas, Tyler Masamori, Robert O’Francia, Nigel Miller Matt Windt, Ryan Deane, Ryan Delong, Boris Quintanilla and Brixton Lagua. Head Coach Ron Mehuron and assistants Vic Miguel, Jesus Cardoza, Ben Samson and Jesus Cortez.

Sentinel preseason write up. August 29. After struggling through a 0-10 season filled with last second losses and near spoiler opportunities, the SC program has little to lose. But with 21 seniors returning, 13 who have starting experience, this could be the year SC puts the pieces back together. SC is beginning its hunt for greater point production with the biggest offensive lines in Cardinal football history. The line, featuring All County Sophomore Player of the Year, Pedro Ibarra at 6-2, 270 is anchored by Daniel Cortez, 6-0, 300, Jeff Truhitte, 6-0, 240 and Junior, George Urban, 6-2, 270. “We only have a couple of linemen under 200 pounds,” said coach Ron Mehuron. “Our linemen were the hardest working group of players over our double day practice sessions. It’s nice, I can’t single out one person, who has stood out, because they all worked hard.” Behind that line, SC has the opportunity to have an effective running game, especially with the return of leading senior rusher Jason Cardoza, rushed for 427 yards last year, which makes him the SCCAL top returning rusher. He will be sharing the running back duties with seniors Bracken Christopher and Jonathan Howard.
SC had no All league players last year. But a lot of young players got varsity experience a year ago and a stronger senior presence has given the team something to build on. “We have a more experience turnout of senior football players,” said Mehuron, who is in his twenty-fourth season at the helm of SC’s football program. “I have about 16 returning players. That’s a huge difference from last year.
At the quarterback position, juniors Sam Martisius and Chris George are competing with returning starter Kenyatte Edmond, who threw for 246 yards with three touchdowns and seven interceptions last season. Tyler Masamori, Ryan DeLong and Matt Windt are shaping up to be a good group of defensive backs.

Sentinel. September 15. Santa Cruz A Loser No Longer. SC snapped a 14 game losing streak with a 29-20 victory over RLS. “The key was our line play on both sides of the ball,” said Coach Mehuron. It was a rough losing streak that included five shutouts and nine games the Cards scored seven points or less.
SC which averages 260 pounds on the offensive line was able to control the smaller Pirates when it needed to. SC running backs Jonathan Howard and Jason Cardoza each scored two touchdowns. The last TD was Howard’s 59 yard run with 5:43 remaining, which allowed the Cards to move from two points ahead to 29-20. Howard a 5-11, 185 pound senior broke four tackles on the big run. He finished with 149 yards rushing on 19 carries behind his big blockers up front.
The Cards came up big on defensively too. With the score at 22-20 SC, Stevenson drove to the 16 yard line, but SC stacked up the Pirates and kept them out of the end zone. Then turned around and scored on Howard’s long run. Cardoza, also a senior, caught only two passes in the game, but they both went for touchdowns of 61 yards and 9 yards. Howard’s first touchdown run went three yards, powered behind junior blockers Dan Cortez at 6-1, 300 and George Urban 6-2, 270.
Mehuron went with junior quarterback Sam Mattisius, who responded by going 5 of 8 for 96 yards and two TD’s to Cardoza, and did not throw any interceptions. The teams have been playing for 15 straight years and the series is now 7-7-1.

Sentinel. September 28. Cardinals Rediscover Home Field Advantage. The Cards last non league home football win was on September 23, 1994 against Westmont of Campbell. SC hopped aboard the coattails of Jason Cardoza and Jonathan Howard to bully past Westmont 40-16, to up their record to 2-1 and also snap the Cards nine game home losing streak. It should bolster the confidence of the Cards going into next weeks league opener with SLV. “Right now, the kids just feel good about winning,” said Coach Mehuron, whose team went winless last year. “They improved from last week and they’ll use that as a motivator. I don’t want to make it too simplistic, but we need to continually improve, that’s what we are really after. But if we’re just happy with this game and if we accept the status quo, we’re in trouble and it will be a long day against SLV.”
SC went over, around and through Westmont, piling up a gaudy 487 yards of total offense. That nearly totaled what they’d had in the first two games combined 548. While Cardoza,with three TD’s and Howard 120 yards rushing and two TD’s were the chief benefactors of the offensive onslaught, the main engineers were the domination of the offensive line. “It was good for the offensive line to get down and dirty and move people off the line,” said guard Jeff Truhitte. “It was real important for us to come out and show that we can play real hard football, especially after last weeks loss.”
Daniel Cortez, Brandon Williams, George Urban and John Peterson were the other starters on the offensive line. Howard, whose 269 yards led all SCCAL rushers heading into the game, started and ended the scoring binge for SC. He burst through the line for a four yard score on SC’s initial drive of the game. His 46 yard romp with three seconds left in the game came on a play that was designed to just run out the clock.
But it was a big night of big plays for the Cards, Howard exploded through a big hole and he also earned his third straight game with more than 100 yards. SC led 27-9 at halftime. Junior quarterback Sam Martisius completed his first six passes including an 80 yard TD strike to speedy Cordoza for a 21-3 lead, midway through the second quarter. Martisius finished the game 9 for 12 passing for 192 yards and two TD’s. Cardoza accounted for 22 points on three touchdowns and four extra points to finish with 79 yards rushing and 96 yards receiving. Junior running back Matt Windt hauled in a 15 yard pass from Martisius in the second quarter to give SC a 14-3 lead. Cardoza then scored two touchdowns to put the game away at halftime.

October 18. SC lost to undefeated SLV 34-20, two weeks ago. Then SC lost to Harbor 0-28 this past week, which has been the low point of the season. A team that averaged 244 yards a game rushing was held to 45 by Harbor. SCCAL rushing leader Jonathan Howard was held to minus four against Harbor. The streak that seemed on the verge of ending in any given week, has grown by two games.
“The last two weeks have been very hard losses for us,” said Mehuron. “And last week, we felt was a real step backward. That was the pivotal point of our season. Now we have to regroup. Losses can break a team apart. The whole thing is to keep the team together and when the time comes where the breaks go their way, they have enough unity and belief in themselves to bring them through.” For SC, it’s future truly is now.
The schools enrollment continues to decline and for the past two years, the football program had trouble getting its freshman to return as sophomores. This year SC had to drop its freshman team. The lack of experienced young athletes is expected to be felt on the varsity over the next two years.
But somehow, SC football will bounce back. It’s doing so now and it has a history of doing it before. A 2-7 season in 1988 was followed by 6-3 in 89. It’s 3-7 in 1991 was followed by 7-3 and 12-1 seasons. “I don’t think about the record, I think about the opponent,” Mehuron said. Thus, the streak remains in the shadows. And soon will remain there permanently.

October 26. Cardinals Snap Streak. Momentum Shift Kills MVC’s Hopes. Tied at 7-7 early in the second quarter, Monte Vista had first and goal on the four yard line. On fourth down a MVC pass in the end zone was dropped. SC took over and on the first play, Jonathan Howard burst through the line and exploded down the sideline for a 95 yard touchdown sprint to give SC a 14-7 lead.
MVC the imploded, fumbling possessions away on consecutive plays, while SC scored follow each fumble. The result was 20 unanswered points for SC, a yardage disparity of 160-0 in favor of SC, all in a span of just over six minutes that gave SC a 27-7 halftime lead. In short the ball game. SC improves to 1-3 in league and 3-4 overall. Lost amid the numbers, the big plays and SC’s homecoming, was the stark fact that SC broke its 13 game SCCAL losing streak. The last league win was against MVC two years ago.
“Our whole team just stepped it up and gave all our energy for the second quarter,” said Pedro Ibarra, SC’s massive and talented offensive lineman. “We won because our offense and defense stuck together and did their jobs. All we’re worried about is the next game.” “Stopping MVC on the goal line was a big play,” said coach Mehuron. “That was at a point in the game they could have gained some momentum.”
Even stranger was the second half. MVC held the ball the entire third quarter, while SC didn’t have an offensive series until the fourth quarter. MVC initial drive after receiving the kickoff, ended with a 11 yard touchdown strike cutting SC’s lead to 27-14. Bracken Christopher took the ensuing kickoff 85 yards for a touchdown, giving SC a 34-14 lead with 6:22 to play in the third quarter. MVC had another long drive through the rest of the quarter. Howard finished the game with impressive numbers: 158 yards rushing in 13 carries and three touchdowns. Jason Cardoza had 95 yards rushing and two touchdowns. Defensively Matt Anderson had two sacks, while Tyler Masamori had one interception and one pass deflection.

Sentinel ALL COUNTY first team offense honored on Cardinal, Jeff Truhitte a senior, 6-4, 255, guard. Jason Cardoza was honorable mention as a running back and kicker.

JV FOOTBALL Season record 3-6-1.
Yearbook. There was not enough sophomores to fill out the JV team, so the freshmen moved up to play against JV competition with the sophomores. Sophomore leaders were Ryan Meyers, Keith Quilici, Carl Lund, Mike Croghan and Manny Kester.

Although a very young squad, they continued to put up numbers on the board. Coming off a preseason with a 2-1 record, the high hopes for the league season did not materialized. Comments from players were Reynaldo Olivas, “the scores didn’t show how good we really were. Agustin Perez, “We worked hard and had a good attitude against adversity. Keith Quilici, “We had a young team and tough season, but we made the best of it.” Manny Kester, “It was a pretty good season, except for the injuries and lack of experience.” Karl Lund, “We were young, but we played with heart and that is what gave us our hard fought wins.”

Roster: Ricky Salgado, Ryan Meyers, Alex Winterele, Georgie Karaiannopolis, Adrian Rasmussen, Sterling Marizette, Mike Croghan, Sonny Rameriz, Gerraxrdo Rosas, Karl Lund, Josh Earnest, Brandon Mothershed, Manny Kester, Mike Clement, Brandon Belgard, Joey Perez, John Crisara, Eric Paris, Craig McDaniels, Marlin Henton, Jose Alvarez, Aaron Longinotti, Nickos Zappacosta, Raul Escalante, Ricardo Martinez, Jesse Johnson, Josh Long, Chris Newey, Mike Litel, Alex Jones, Richie Alvarez, Mike Lachika, Maricio Perez, Andrew Broxterman, Reynaldo Olivas, Augustin Perez, Keith Quilici, Roland Guerrero, Masai Kenyatta, Bernabe David and Carlos Valdez.
Head Coach John Hopping and assistants Quilici, Criswell, Shawn and Bob Kittle.

Sentinel All County team: Offense: Jeff Truhitte, 5-11, 240, senior guard; Honorable mention: Jason Cardoza, running back and kicker.

CROSS COUNTRY BOYS
Yearbook. The varsity had only one runner, Jacob Huskey, who made a fine showing at the league meet.

The JV boys ran to a first place league finish. Team members: Jacob Huskey, Joel Devalcourt, Daniel Graybill, Aaron Mohmed, Torrey Smith and Ricky Lopez. Coach Marcus Marquez.

CROSS COUNTRY GIRLS
Yearbook Seniors Bridgette Connerly, Jenny Croghan and Heidi Brockman placed sixth, twenty-fifth and twenty-seventh respectively, to lead the team to a fifth place over all finish at the league meet. Isis Sien, Jackie Ramos and Jenny Bullock completed the squad. Coach Claire Choate.

Both Connerly and Croghan qualified for the CCS meet as individuals.

GIRLS TENNIS
League record 3-7, for fifth place. League scores available. Soquel 5-2, Watsonville 5-2, SLV 3-4.

Yearbook. Number one player was freshman Kendyll Whiting and junior Greta Hanson was the number two player. They double up and made a formidable doubles team wining the league doubles title and continued to the finals of CCS, before having to forfeit due to a change in the schedule. Seniors Sara Walsh and Catherine Dunn are the only girls not returning.

Trident, October 10. The team consists of seniors: Catherine Dunn, Sarah Walsh and Julie Mestdagh. Juniors: Greta Hansen and Saori Anan. Sophomores: Malena Vega, Jamie Kilburn, Angie Woodard, Tami Pinheiro, Alysia Piffero, Emily Caviglia, Jillian Swenson, Jill Thompson, Catherine Bartz, Molly Devine, Eleanor Haber and Karin Pearson. Freshman: Kendyll Whiting and Audrey Waller. New coach Rick Balassone.

Sentinel. October 11. SC 5, Soquel 2. In a rematch of its earlier 4-3 loss to Soquel, SC came out with a nearly identical lineup, but this time controlled the Knights. SC’s number one player Kendyll Whiting lost 3-6, 2-6. But SC won the next three singles matches. The winners were in order from two down: Gerta Hansen, Malena Vega and Catherine Bartz, who replaced ill Karinn Pearson. Bartz is 2-0 since moving up the ladder and has helped the Cards in their two league victories.

October 16. SC 5, Watsonville 2. The Cards dominated the singles play. At number one singles, Kendyll Whiting started the ball rolling winning 6-4, 7-6 (7-2). Greta Hansen won 6-4, 6-2. Melina Vega won 6-4, 0-6, 6-2. Katherine Bartz won 6-0. 6-3. Watsonville won the number two and three doubles. The losing doubles teams for the Cards were Saori Anan and Alysia Piffero lost 2-6, 0-6.. Angie Woodard and Tammy Pinheiro lost 4-6, 6-4, 3-6. SC improve its record to 3-4.

October 29. SLV 4, SC 3. The Cougars finished out their season with their first win. Losers for the Cards were Kendyll Whiting 1-6, 1-6. Greta Hansen 3-6, 1-6. Katherine Bartz 3-6, 1-6. In number three doubles Tammy Pinheiro and Alysia Piffero lost 2-6, 4-6. SC winners in doubles were Katherine Dunn and Sarah Walsh plus the team of Saori Anan and Angie Woodard. ( The Cards winnerS in singles not listed. It was SLV home match) SC finished the season 3-7.

Trident, November 14. Girls Tennis Getting In the Swing Of Things. The season has come to a close with SC in the middle of the league standings. The season started slowly an then picked up momentum as the team got in the to swing of things. Even though the teams season is over, there is still the league individual finals are coming up. Because of the teams standing in the league, SC will send two doubles teams to the finals. Kendyll Whiting and Greta Hansen, the teams top two singles players will form one team and Catherine Dunn and Sara Walsh the other team. Sara Walsh one of the top doubles players will play in the singles competition. Come to our games next year. We even serve free food.

Trident, December 18. After falling short in the last match of the season against SLV in the last match of the year, the team ended up in fifth place. With a win over SLV it would have been third place for SC. At the individual SCCAL championships, singles player Sara Walsh lost 2-6, 1-6. Number one doubles pair Greta Hansen and Kenydll Whiting played their first round against Soquel to win 7-5, 6-3. In the next round against Aptos, Hansen went up against one of the players who had beaten her and her partner last year. But this year she came out on top in one of the longest matches in league history 7-6 (10-8), 6-7 (7-9), 7-6 (11-9). The semifinal match lasted just over three hours, which is more than twice the average length for a match. The next day in the finals, they defeated Watsonville in three sets for the league Championship. Unfortunately, Hansen and Whiting were not able to continue to CCS.

BOYS WATER POLO
Watsonville tournament; Watsonville 3-13, Monterey 13-6, Aptos 6-11, North Salinas 6-8, Harbor 2-24. League play Aptos 10-11. League 0-8 second year in row. Season record 2-18.

Yearbook. With only two experience players back, the team had to compete in a strong experience league. Wily senior Steve Kele, an extremely strong and intelligent player emerged as a team leader and explosive senior Casey Nichols carried the team. Nichols was the most potent scorer on the team, but was complemented by surprising freshman Corey Atkins, who proved to be a goal scoring threat. Standout Sophomore Augustus Stanchfield said, “These guys carried us. They are pretty good.” Even though the team won only two games this year, the seniors taught the youngsters well and they will be prepared to carry on next year. Freshman Tim Daly commented, “It was cool. We didn’t win a lot, but we really got better.
Rest of squad: Colin Constant, Forrest Myatt, Lloyd Mueller, Chuck, Royce Perez, T. J. Magdallenes, Casey White, Goalie Owen Commons, Sean Echols, Matt Foster and Carlos.
Coach Brett Emmons.

Trident, October 10. With only two returning starters, senior Steve Kele, who is one of the best defensive players in the SCCAL and goal scoring specialist Casey Nichols, who in the last five games scored 18 goals. In addition to Kele and Nichols, Cory Atkins and Brad Jones are highly skilled freshmen starters, who gives new coach Brad Emmons some material to work toward at least a break even season. In September at the Watsonville tournament, SC lost to Watsonville 13-3, beat Monterey 13-6, lost to Aptos 11-6 and to North Salinas 8-6. Then Harbor beat them 24-2.

Trident, November 14. The season ended with a heart breaking loss 11-10 to Aptos. The game was shrouded in controversy as the underdog Cards got an early lead and held it through the second period. Towards the end of the second period, defensive specialist Steve Kele received his second ejection of the game. At that point the desk stated that Kele had three ejections and was out of the game. Kele sat out the third period and Aptos mounted a scoring drive to go ahead for a one point lead. It was then discovered that Kele only had two ejections and was allowed to play the rest of the game. This loss marks the second straight year SC has not won a league game. Despite the excellent team play, along with the strong individual performances by seniors Kele and Nichols, SC ended the season 2-18. With up and coming players like Cory Atkins, Matt Foster and Brad Jones the future looks bright.

The ALL SCCAL first team included no Cards. On the second team was senior Steve Kele. Honorable mention were Corey Atkins, Lloyd Mueller and Casey Nichols.

JV WATER POLO
Trident, October 10. Freshman Matt Foster led the team to a victory over North Salinas 7-6 in overtime. With the large number of new freshman players and the amazing amount of talent they bring to the water, the future looks bright for the future.

GIRLS WATER POLO SCCAL CHAMPIONS In first year of girls competition.
Scores available. Hollister 16-5, Harbor 5-1, Aptos 9-6, Soquel 8-6, 5-3.
In the SCCAL round robin schedule the Cards took first place with a 11-1 record. In the SCCAL playoff final defeated Soquel 5-3 for the SCCAL championship.
CCS playoffs: Defeated Lincoln of San Jose 10-4 in the first round . Lost to Menlo 8-3 in quarterfinal. League record 11-1. Overall record 13-2.

Yearbook. This was the first year of sanctioned girls water polo in the SCCAL. After a wildly successful preseason the girls entered the league as favorites. A surprise loss to Soquel early in league was avenged with an exciting win over Soquel in the league championship game at UCSC for the SCCAL title. The team progressed all the way to the semi-finals of the CCS playoffs, when they challenged powerhouse Menlo.

Sophomore Diana Willis and league MVP Corey Miller rotated at the hole set, a position to set up the offense. Shelley Gill and Laura Strickland were the drivers, while Ellen Sherrill and Ali Chapin took turns in the goal. Rest of squad: Katie Simas, Adrienne Kramer, Hillory Brooks, Allison Marshall, Crystal Geiger and Analuisa Ochoa.

Sentinel. October 16. SC 5, Harbor 1. Corey Miller’s three goals led the Cards to victory as the SC defense stopped Harbor. Laura Strickland and Adrienne Cramer were noted for their outstanding play as were goalies Ellen Sherrill and Ali Chapin.

Sentinel. October 30. SC 16, Hollister 5. Goalie Ali Chapin playing the last quarter in the field, had two goals, while making seven saves. Corey Miller led the way with eight goals. SC 9-1 had goals from Shelly Gill, Laura Strickland, Kate Semas and Diana Willis.

November 6. SC 9, Aptos 6. SC kept pace with Soquel with an important win over Aptos. Corey Miller had three goals and four assists, while goalie Ellen Sherrill had seven saves.

November 8. SC 8, Soquel 6. In another intense match against Soquel, the Cards secured the number one seed in next weeks league tournament with a strong defensive effort. Goalies Ellen Sherrill and Allison Marshall combined to stop nine shots, while Sherrill added two goals, SC finished the regular season 11-1 in league.

SC Girls Grab SCCAL Water Polo Title. SC became the first ever league champions by downing Soquel 5-3. The game was a defensive struggle from start to finish. SC was able to exert strong pressure on Soquel’s offense, often pushing outside drivers to the fringes of the pool.
The defensive nature of the game played well to SC’s style, which focuses on possession. “Ball control worked for us today,” said coach Aubrey Miller. Corey Miller, the senior star was instrumental in the SC’s victory. “Corey really played up for this game. She was the determining factor on offense and defense,” said her father the coach. In addition to scoring three of SC’s five points, Miller provided strong defensive in the hole, often shutting it down by fronting on Soquel’s hole set and disrupting the Knights offensive scheme.
SC led the game most of the way with Soquel nipping closely at their heels. Miller started the scoring on a SC power play, but Soquel set it even with a shot from the hole set spot. SC moved ahead again when Miller scored the only point of the second quarter, a surprise lob with two seconds left on the shot clock SC put it our of reach in the fourth by establishing a two goal margin, which Soquel could not overcome.

Santa Cruz Girls Advance In CCS Water Polo Tournament. Santa Cruz the SCCAL champion, played Lincoln in its home pool and won 10-4, behind the spectacular play of seniors Ellen Sherrill and Allison Chapin. “We had a lot of fast breaks. We played man to man defense on the perimeter and it really gave them a lot of trouble,” said assistant coach Emilie Cates. The trouble was led by Sherrill and Chapin, who alternated as goalies and field players.
Sherrill played goalie in the first quarter and had two saves, then made eight more saves in the fourth quarter. Between goalie stints Sherrill was an offensive force, scoring three goals. Chapin played solid goal tending and scored a goal.
Also leading the way on offense were sophomore Diana Willis, who scored three goals and senior Corey Miller, who scored three times. The Cards led 7-2 at the half. The win puts SC overall record a sparkling 13-1. I’m impressed with this group. They’re there first to have fun, winning has been a benefit. We figure we have nothing to lose against Menlo, we‘re just going to try and un-seed the top seed,” said Cates, who played for UCSC for four years.

Trident December 18. In the CCS quarterfinals, the Cards lost to eventual CCS champion Menlo 8-3. SC scored their three goals in the second half. Corey Miller scored on fast break drives for two goals and Ali Chapin scored the other goal as well as making four saves as goal keeper. Ellen Sherrill also had four saves in the goal as they switched places from the goal to the tank. SC did outscore Menlo in the second half. After the game some girls from Menlo came into the locker room and told the girls what a good game they played and that they should have been ranked as second or third seeds. The girls even though they lost, felt like they had accomplished a great deal and gained a lot of respect.

The ALL SCCAL Girls water polo picked by the league coaches listed three SC players on the first team and two on the second team. League Most Valuable Player was Corey Miller and the Coach of the Year was Aubrey Miller. On the first team were Corey Miller, Shelly Gill and Ali Chapin. On the second team Laura Strickland and Ellen Sherrill. Honorable mention were Diana Willis and Allison Marshall.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Scores: Mills 3-1. Santa Cruz Invitational: defeated North Monterey, Fremont, Half Moon Bay and Monterey. Lost in finals to North Salinas 0-2 for second place. League: SLV 3-2, Watsonville 3-0. (Last league record mentioned was 4-5, with three matches to go) Overall record 16-15 to be ranked eighth in the Monterey Bay area.

Yearbook. With only two seniors and new coach, PE teacher Kim Cave, the team did well enough to make it to the CCS playoffs for the fourth year in a row. “We had a season of peaks and valleys. The girls worked hard and played with intensity. I hope this will carry over into next season, while the girls are working to get better and stronger,” said coach Cave. Standout outside hitter Ella Harley will be back next year along with nine other returning players.

Captains were senior Anita Fearnley and junior Cori Tom. The one other senior was the all around athlete Jennifer Cummings. Roster: Ella Harley, Elena Russel-Nava, Audrey Lin, Lily Abood, Anita Fearnley, Amy Reidt, Megan Eastman, Katie Hintz, Laura Logan, Kelly Howell, Cori Tom, Jennifer Cummings and Coach Kim Cave.

Sentinel preseason write up on September 20. Coach Kim Cave, first year. Last years record; 13-16 overall and 5-7 in league for fourth place. Key senior, 5-11, Middle blocker, Jennifer Cummings. Juniors Cori Tom, 5-8, middle blocker and Amy Reidt, 5-10, outside hitter. Sophomore, 6-0, outside hitter, Ella Harley.
Scouting report: First year coach Kim Cave is encouraged from what she has seen so far in the early going and the Cards appear to have the pieces in place. Six foot sophomore, Harley will be one of the brightest spots for SC as an outside hitter as she continues to mature as a leader and lead the team in kills match in and match out. Complimenting her are Reidt, Megan Eastman, Katie Hintz and a contingent of sophomores battling for minutes.
Up front the Cards are led by junior Tom and first year player Jennifer Cummings, better known for her prowess as a softball pitcher, has been very steady as a back row specialist in the early going. Setting the ball in the SC 6-2 offense are Anita Fearnley and Elena Russell-Nava. Coaches outlook:
Cave is excited about her teams prospects. I think we are looking at a really strong season, if we play aggressive at the net, put up some big blocks, make sure all our serves go in and most importantly communicate at the net, we’re gonna be tough.

September 11. SC 3, Mills 1. Scoring: 15-6, 15-9, 12-15, 15-3. Ella Harley dominated the net, Jennifer Cummings played a great back row defense, Megan Eastman controlled the outside and Anita Fearnley set the table. “This was a good stepping stone for us. We still need to make some adjustments, but we played well,” said coach Cave. Harley led the way with seven kills, Cummings served up five aces and Cori Tom notched five blocks.

Sentinel. September 15. Santa Cruz Invitational. SC came pretty close to stealing their own show, but fell in the finals to North Salinas 15-17, 9-15. SC picked up victories over North Monterey, Fremont, Half Moon Bay and Monterey en-route to the finals. Sophomore Ella Harley paced the Cards with 32 kills. Corey Tom provided a strong presence in the middle with nine blocks, Anita Fearnley with nine blocks and Ellena Russell-Nava dug the ball well all day.

September 18. SC finished the non-league season with a 15-9, 15-9, 15-9 victory over North Monterey. Ella Harley’s seven kills and seven aces paced SC. Cori Tom played solid at the net. Megan Eastman and Amy Reidt chipped in four kills apiece from the outside. Jennifer Cummings played steady in the back row, according to coach Kim Cave. Cave said, “They’re coming together pretty well. We’re starting to play more like a unit than six individuals.

September 25. SC and SLV fought the toughest battle of the opening day of SCCAL play, but SC won 15-4, 12-15, 8-15, 15-10, 15-3. “We fell apart in games two and three, missing a lot of serves. But in game 4, we put our serves back in, regained composure and played well,” said coach Cave. Ella Harley paved the way for SC, tallying 14 kills, 6 aces and ten digs. Amy Reidt played consistent at the net and Audrey Lin was a spark off the bench as opposite side hitter. In the crucial fifth game, Cori Tom served up eight straight points including two aces.

Sentinel October 9. Aptos swept SC 15-2, 15-11, 15-4. (Aptos home game. No SC info)

Trident, October 10. The volleyball team has gotten off to a rip roaring start. The team is showing the most enthusiasm seen in a long time. The starting lineup is Anita Fearnley, Amy Reidt, Katie Hintz, Cori Tom, Ellen Russell-Nava, Jennifer Cummings and Ella Harley.
At the league jamboree, they smashed every team including the famed Harbor Pirates.
League started on September 26, with SC winning the first game, but they lost their second game to Monte Vista, which makes SC 1-1 on the season.

October 16. Santa Cruz Puts Scare Into Harbor. The scrappy Cards nearly pushed the perennial league champs to five games, before succumbing 12-15, 15-2, 15-4, 15-13. It was the first time since 1993 that Harbor had lost a game to SC. SC, who is 2-4 in league and 10-8 overall controlled the action in game one with their serve, capitalizing on nearly every ball shanked by the Pirates. Megan Eastman and Cori Tom did it with the block, Anita Fearnley did it with the serve and Ella Harley did it with a big right arm. But game two and three were all Harbor. The game one Cards did return in game four, as did the game one Pirates. SC battled back from a 11-6 deficit to go up 13-11 and give Harbor a real score. Tom had six solo blocks, Harley tallied 12 kills and Jennifer Cumming was the steady passer from the back row.

October 30. SC defeated Watsonville 15-7, 15-10, 15-10. Playing her final home match, senior Anita Fearnley got the Cards rolling in the first game with seven straight points, including three aces. Katie Hintz had eight kills and Ella Harley seven for the Cards, who improved to 4-5 in league and 12-9 overall. SC also got fine play from middle hitter Amy Reidt with six kills and the passing of Audry Lin.

SC was ranked eighth with a 16-15 record in the November 19 Monterey Bay Area girls volleyball ranking, complied by the Sentinel and Salinas Californian. The other SCCAL schools ranked were Monte Vista at number one with a 23-3 record. Aptos second at 19-9. Harbor fourth at 19-7.

The Sentinel ALL COUNTY team did not included any SC players, but Ella Harley was selected at the SOPHOMORE OF THE YEAR.

December 3. ALL SCCAL selected by the coaches selected Ella Harley as Sophomore of the Year. Junior, Middle back at 4-8, Cori Tom was selected on the second team.

JV GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Record 12-3.
Yearbook. The team was led by captains, junior Laura Beach, sophomore Tracey Baldwin and freshman standout Cristal Santos. Roster: Lily Mandel, Chana Orecan, Molly Kearney, Sara Dubin, Irene Sherwood, Laura Beach, Hope Anderson, Gabriela Chirinos, Tracey Baldwin, Callie Griggs, Alexandria McKee, Paige Nutt, Cristal Santos and Karen Martisius. Coach Donna Beronia.

BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL FOURTH CONSECUTIVE LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP. Lost in the SCCAL playoff final to SLV, so must share the title. SC and SLV are Co- Champions.
Practice games: RLS 69-55, St. Francis of Mt. View loss, Alisal won.
Dads Club: defeated Aptos by 20 point win, Paso Robles lost, Soquel lost for seventh place.
Gilroy Tournament: Live Oak 43-75, Palma 69-38, Harbor won. SC takes consolation title
Soquel Tourney: North Monterey 68-41, Los Gatos 55-60, Soquel 60-44 for fifth place.
Pinewood Tourney: won first game, Lick Wilmerding of San Francisco 50-41, Hillsdale 39-48 in finals for second place.
League: Harbor 72-49, 89-63; Aptos 61-44, 52-40; Watsonville 69-37, 67-46; Soquel 78-46, 61-46 SLV 101-44, 65-56; Monte Vista two wins. Final league record 11-1. SCCAL playoffs: Aptos 69-48, finals lost to SLV 68-75. SLV and SC Co-Champions.
CCS Division III playoffs: Aragon 69-51; Jefferson quarterfinals 60-45 and semifinals lost to undefeated 25-0 Hillsdale.38-61.
League round robin 11-1 for title. Lost in SCCAL playoffs to SLV to share the league title. Overall record 21-9.

League standings from Sentinel by school, league record and overall record.
SCH LE OV
SC 11-1 21-9
SLV 8-4 17-8
Harbor 8-4 12-14
Soquel 7-5 13-14
Aptos 4-8 9-14
MVC 4-8 7-19
Watsonville ? 4-21

Yearbook. This years team made SCCAL history winning their fourth consecutive championship. Despite a difficult preseason, including the Dad’s Club Tournament, the Cards led by senior point guard Nick Theodosis made an impressive rebound, by opening league with ten straight wins, including a 101-44 pounding of second place SLV. Coach Pete Newell summed up the year by saying, “Our team realized its potential and became the first school in the SCCAL to win four straight league championships.”

Along with Theodosis, leadership and experience was provided by seniors; Keitel Chirinos, Tayo Enna, Mike Harbison, Demitreus Hunter, Clay Tol and league leading rebounded Jermaine Hunter. Next years team has some big shoes to fill, but the future looks bright with promising freshman Tyler Williams and 6”5” sophomore Marcel Jackson. Rest of the team: Kris Fullum, Eric Lynch and Ben Sorenson. Head coach Pete Newell and assistant Eddie Mascari.

Sentinel. November 30. SC Boys Win Opener. (but no final score) Tayo Enna scored 19 points and grabbed six rebounds to led SC, which scored the first eight points to bury North Monterey. It was a near perfect season opener for SC. They executed their half court and full court offenses well and played consistently in each quarter, scoring 21, 20, 20 and 19 points. Twelve Cards scored.

December 2. Sentinel preseason write up. Cardinals take Aim At Another Title. Santa Cruz Holds All Cards. Newell Out To Lead Cardinals To Fourth Straight League Title.
Newell in his twenty-second year with the Cardinals isn’t about to let complacency and success spoil what looks to be another banner year on paper. Last year the team went 24-7
overall and 11-1 in league for first place. “Its hard to evaluate any team this early in the season. We have nine players who’ve never played varsity basketball before. We’re a relatively young team that is learning to compete at this level,” Newell said. But don’t be afraid to call Newell’s bluff.
There are seven returning players from last years team. Returning seniors are point guard, 5-11, Nick Theodosis; forward, 6-5, Jermaine Hunter; forward, 6-5, Tayo Enna; guard, 5-10, Mike Harbison; center, 6-6, Clay Toll; center, 6-3 Kaitel Chirinos; guard, 6-5, Serio Meredith. The electrifying Theodosis enters his third year as a varsity starter, who was named the SCCAL Junior of the Year last season. Enna is gaining rave reviews as the most improved player on the squad. “Theodosis is very much the key to our teams success. And Hunter has the potential, if he’s healthy to be the best big player in the league,” Newell said. While Newell says, that it’ll take a month of games for the team’s personality to show, SC looks to be the team to beat.

December 4. SC 69, RLS 55. Guard Nick Theodosis scored 18 points and senior Tayo Enna added 11 as the Cards improved to 2-0.

Sentinel. December 8. SC Blows Up, Blows Lead. SC gave away a 11 point halftime lead, lost the third place game and left more than 800 fans wondering where its star point guard went. Frustrated team leader Nick Theodosis rose from the bench and walked out of the Civic Auditorium at the beginning of the fourth quarter and SC never regained its once commanding lead. Amid the confusion, Soquel snatched a 65-59 win and the third place Dad Tournament trophy.
Theodosis and four other starters spent all but seven seconds of the third period on the bench after being out rebounded 23-17 in the first half. “I was trying to find five kids who wanted to compete. That’s the purpose of being out there. The group that went in during the third quarter did a fine job,” Coach Newell. When Newell asked the starters to return to the floor for the start of the fourth quarter, Theodosis refused and later left the Auditorium. Soquel erased a 32-21 halftime deficit to tie the score 45-45 at the end of the third quarter. SC pulled to 52-51 with 4:17 left on a Jermaine Hunter basket in the paint. SC was led by Tayo Enna’s 12 point effort. SC is now 1-2.

Jermaine Hunter and Tayo Enna were selected for the Dads Club All Tournament team.

Trident, December 18. At the Dads Club SC played Aptos in the first game and led 17-2 after the first quarter. SC built the lead up to 36 points and ended the game with a 20+ lead.
In the second game of the tournament, which should have been the championship game against Paso Robles, ended up as an SC loss, their first of the preseason. SC played hard through three quarters, but in the fourth they ran out of gas.
Saturday night was hell for the Cards. Thinking that it would be a easy win over Soquel, the Cards came out strong in the first half and went into intermission with a double digit lead. The second half was a different story as the Cards lost their second game in a row.

Trident. St. Francis of Mt. View was tough on the Cards in their first game after the Dads Club. The Cards stayed with them the first half, but the second half was almost a blow out. SC started to come back in the fourth quarter, but it didn’t make a difference in the outcome.
In the following game against Alisal, which was a much weaker team, the Cards weren’t too happy at half time with the closeness of the score. But the score was close to the end. Missed free throws killed SC’s chance to put the game away. With SC up by two with a few seconds left, Alisal took a desperation three pointer that bounced off the backboard and went in for a SC win
.
Trident. At the Gilroy tournament Los Gatos out rebounded the Cards and forced turnovers to blast SC 75-43 in what one of the players called “garbage time’.
In the second game of the tournament against Palma, Coach Newell played just five players the whole game as SC routed Palma 69-38. Nick Theodosis reached his season high with 37 points, Clay Tol had 14, Tayo Enna 10, Keitel Chirinos got six and freshman Tyler Williams got a few too. These five stopped the losing streak at five games.
The Cards easily defeated Harbor for the consolation title. After the game, three players departed the team and two went to play on the JV’s.

Trident. At the Soquel Tournament, SC easily beat North Monterey for the second time. In the second game the Cards played Los Gatos in a good, close game, but lost 60-55. In the consolation game against Soquel the Cards were amped to make up for their loss to the Knights at the Dad Club. They did 60-44. Jermaine Hunter was chosen for the All Tourney team and was awarded the Player of the Week by the Sentinel.

December 27. At the Soquel Tournament, SC played an outstanding game defensively against North Monterey winning 68-41, to improve its record to 6-5. SC continued its string of strong defensive efforts, holding an opponent to under 50 points for the third straight game. North Monterey was held to 17 points in the first half. “We have been defending very well. Our players have gone about their business in a very cool manner lately,” said assistant coach Eddie Mascari. Ten players scored for SC, with Jermaine Hunter leading the way with 17 points and eight rebounds. Theodosis continued his strong all around play, scoring nine points and handing out eight assists. Also pitching in was freshman guard Tyler Williams, who scored nine points.

December 29. Santa Cruz Back In Form In Rout Of Soquel. Ten days ago the SC basketball team decided how it wanted to finish the season. The Cards used Saturday night as a platform to introduce the decision. “We had a choice of whether to let this season slide downhill or to pick it up,” said senior Jermaine Hunter. “We decided to pick it up.” Hunter picked up 22 rebounds and scored 14 points.
SC 7-6, took the Soquel tournaments third place trophy with a 60-44 win over Soquel. SC had an outstanding night on the glass out rebounding Soquel 35-19, including a 11-3 advantage in the second period. Coach Newell was pleased with his teams recent string of good showings after losing to Live Oak in a 30 point blow out ten days ago. SC played a crisp third quarter, that fittingly ended with Hunter grabbing a rebound and laying it in for two points for a 50-31 advantage. SC turned the ball over only twice in the quarter. SC used a steady diet of Hunter rebounds and Theodosis drives on a 14-5 run to start the period. Theodosis finished with 14 points and forced several Knight turnovers. Both Theodosis and Hunter were named to the All Tournament team. “So much of rebounding is position and determination. More than half of his rebounds were simple because of determination. Hunter has been hampered by illness and a back injury that at times has been frustrating to him,” said Newell. Hunter dismissed any talk that the win was a payback for Soquel’s six point win against SC in the third place game of the Dads Tournament.

January 4. Santa Cruz Heads To Final. Cardinals To Play Undefeated Hillsdale Tonight. In its fourth tournament this season. SC advanced to its first championship game of the Pinewood Tournament. In the semifinals against San Francisco’s Lick- Wilmerding, the Cards were never threatened in winning 50-41. Tayo Enna scored a team high 14 points and Nick Theodosis added ten. SC took a 10-0 lead and Lick never got closer then seven points after that. SC extended it’s lead to 16 in the second half. SC controlled the defensive boards. SC has improved its finish in each tournament, finishing a season best third in its most recent at Soquel. Both Hillsdale and SC are CCS Division III teams expected to reach the playoffs. Last year in a practice game Hillsdale won 82-51.

January 7. SCCAL Could Be ‘Santa Cruz And The 6 Dwafs’ Things did not start out quite like Pete Newell had envisioned early in the season. A frustration filled 2-5 start is never the way the perennially powerful Cards basketball program imagines things evolving. Three weeks into the season the Cards were pummeled 75-43 by Live Oak. ‘That was definitely a low point,” Newell said. SC has won six of their last eight heading into SCCAL play, culminating in the biggest confidence builder, a 48-39 defeat at the hands of undefeated Hillsdale in the championship finals of the Pinewood Classic. “That was the best team in this section and we played them tough,” said Newell. SC actually led by five at halftime and held a team averaging 80 plus points per game to a fraction of that.
It’s a performance like that which brought the Cards preseason to a close with a respectable 9-7 record, that has Newell feeling much better about his team as it heads into the beginning of the SCCAL schedule in an opener against Harbor. As Mike Gruber the Harbor says, “Unless they self destruct, SC should take it going away and the rest of us are scrambling.”

January 11. SC 72, Harbor 49. SC grabbed 20 offensive rebounds and had six players score in double figures in the SCCAL opener. “The key for us was rebounding and maintaining our defensive intensity. Even when we had a big lead, we had intensity,” said assistant Eddie Mascari. SC opened a 17-4 lead to start the game, but hot outside shooting by Harbor narrowed the lead to 34-26 at halftime. Jermaine Hunter had another great night on the court for the Cards with 13 points and 13 rebounds. Nick Theodosis had ten points, seven assists an seven steals. Marcel Jackson scored 11 points.

January 15. Cards Burst Past Aptos. SC Still Unbeaten In SCCAL Play. First glances can be so fleeting they sometimes lie. One look into the SC locker room after the game and one would think that they had been upset. Quite the opposite as SC jumped out to a 25-9 first quarter lead and routed Aptos 61-44. SC improved to 2-0 in league and 11-6 overall. But it was the way SC played that had them scratching their heads. SC committed 23 turnovers, including a stretch of seven straight during the second quarter, that let Aptos back into the game late in the third quarter, before retaking control. Leading 35-17 to start the third quarter, the Cards turned over the ball eight times as Aptos began to chip away at the lead.
Aptos went on a 11-4 run in the final three minutes of the third quarter as Aptos cut the lead to 42-33. Over the same stretch SC missed four shots, had five turnovers and missed two foul shots. But during the fourth quarter, SC turned on the jets and regained the crisp play from the first quarter, that allowed them to dominate the game in its early stages. “We have a tendency to not take care of the ball in practice and our play tonight was just an extension of Monday’s practice. We just need to smooth things out,” Newell said.
SC opened the game with a fierce man to man press that forced Aptos into seven turnovers. Forward Tayo Enna had three steals and four points to help key the Cards to a 21-7 lead. Every starter scored in the first quarter as Theodosis collected nine points, four assists and two steals. He finished with a game high of 18 points, five assists and three steals. The key for SC was its imposing front court, 6-6 center Clay Tol and a pair of 6-5 forwards, Jermaine Hunter and Enna. That doesn’t included 6-8 reserve Marcel Jackson.
The quartet combined for 36 points, 12 rebounds and seven blocks, dominating on the offensive end and shutting down any ideas Aptos had of an inside game. Hunter said, “We just need to play hard the whole game. We played good only at times, but that’s just a part of growing. It’s been hard and frustrating because we really haven’t played together a whole lot. We just need to play hard and utilize our talent. At times Aptos had trouble getting the ball across half court against the Cards tough pressure. They had 28 turnovers.

January 19. SC 69, Watsonville 37 . SC now 4-0 in league and 13-7 overall, used a 25 point third quarter to pull away for good as Theodosis poured in a game high 25 points and SC used its size advantage to out rebound Watsonville 54-31. Theodosis also had eight assists, Clay Tol had 13 points, Jermaine Hunter and Marcel Jackson combined for 21 rebounds.

January 22. SC Boys Continue To Gain Steam. After the visiting Cards dismantled Soquel 78-46 it is true, SC is for real and only getting better. SC started strong and finished even stronger, scoring 20 points in the first quarter and 26 in the fourth quarter to improve to 5-0 in league and 14-7 overall. The win moves SC into a first place tie with SLV, which is 5-0, 14-4. The scariest thing for SC’s foes is the fact the coach Newell believes his team is only getting better. “We’re starting to understand where our team strengths are as well as execute our game plan and limit the other teams strengths,” said Newell.
SC with its intimidating inside power game, forced Soquel to live or die from the outside. Clay Tol and Marcel Jackson, two of SC’s strong inside players each tallied five blocks as the Cards totaled 12 in all. Tol hauled down nine rebounds as Jermaine Hinter had eight and Jackson cleared seven boards to go with 13 points. “Clay has been a pleasant surprise for us. He’s a defensive presence inside, he rebounds and can score,” said Newell. It was also how SC spread the scoring that is making SC even better the further they go.
Five players scored in double figures, led by Theodosis with 18 points. Hunter, Tayo Enna and Mike Harbison each had ten points. Tol has noticed his team move past early season injuries that got the team off to a slow start. “I think we’ve matured a lot from the Dad’s Club. We weren’t as serious as we should have been and we’ve been working harder in practice,” he said. “We’re not trying to prove anything except to ourselves. We just want to play our best and people can take it for however they want to take it.”

January 25. SC Makes Its Point. Cardinals Use Basics To Crush SLV. The usual perception of a 101-44 game is of a team pressing, forcing turnovers and sprinting to the other end for layups. SC defeated their closes rival by 67 points without using a press. No full court, defensive frenzy. No fist pumping. No chest bumping. No talking. No baseball passes. Just cool, calm, clinical precision on the defensive end. SC is dominating the league, now in first place an undefeated 6-0 while SLV dropping to second at 5-1.
SC is winning handily because it is playing solid, consistent half court defense, blocking out under the basket, not taking foolish shots, not making stupid fouls and were relentlessly businesslike in their execution. Does that leave anything out? “We executed our game plan well tonight. We attacked their zone early and made the most of our anticipated shots. Our focus is always to win our league. This team is unselfish and gets along well. Our main challenge now is to maintain our focus for the rest of the season,” Newell said. Focus is always easier to keep when you have 11 guys who can play, as Newell does.
The Cards have a lot of players, who do a lot of things. Five player scored in double figures. Tayo Ennaa earned high point honors with 17. Jermaine Hunter scored 12 points and grabbed 12 rebounds. Clay Tol scored 13 points, including three dunks and had eight rebounds. Marcel Jackson had eight points and eight rebounds. And orchestrating everything is point guard Nick Theodosis. He calmly riddled SLV for 15 points, nine assists and four steals. He also defended SLV’s top scorer holding him to 14 points, but the player did not make his first field goal until the third quarter, when the score was 61-20. The player was 0 for4 from the field the first half. During the same span, SC was forced to take only two shots from beyond 10 feet and one of them was a 3-pointer by Theodosis.

February 1. Cardinals Continue To Cruise. 89-63 Win Puts Undefeated SC Boys In Command. SC continued its recent trend of pounding teams at the start of games. SC jumped out to a 30-5 lead against Harbor then cruising to the win. SC is now 7-0 in league and 16-7 overall. “The bottom line is that we continue to execute our game plan. We just have to stay fresh and focused,” said Coach Newell. Four players scored in double figures for SC with freshman Tyler Williams scoring 16 points and converting four of five foul shots. Nick Theodosis and Tayo Enna put in 14 points each an Demetrius Hunter scored 11

February 5. SC 52, Aptos 40. Aptos hung tough, trailing only 36-32 after three quarters. But the fine leadership of point guard Nick Theodosis and solid defense down the stretch to pull away. Aptos milked the clock during the first half, taking SC out of its game and making the most of its own possessions to take a 24-23 halftime lead. Theodosis scored 14 points.

February 9. SC 67, Watsonville 46. Jermaine Hunter scored a game high 23 points, went seven for seven from the foul line to lead SC. Tayo Enna had 16 for the Cards now 9-1 and 18-8. SC led only 27-23 at halftime, but SC wore the Wildcats out with a 18-9 third quarter surge.

February 12. Business Like Approach A Clincher For The Cards. The Cardinal now 10-1 in league and 19-8 overall, clinched a share of the unpredicted fourth straight title with the 61-46 win over Soquel. Jermaine Hunter after playing in his typical blue color style, scoring 22 points and grabbing 10 rebounds, Hunter slipped out the door and quickly disappeared like a factory worker, who’d just punched out. Ten minutes earlier Hunter was fighting for rebounds, playing tenacious defense and banking in lay-in after lay-in. “The last two games, he’s played with a total commitment at both ends of the court. His determination has been incredible,” said Newell.
SC did most of the clinching in the fourth quarter, by limiting Soquel, which played with admirable enthusiasm for three quarters to three points. Near the end of the half, Hunter in a span of 30 seconds, hit a short jumper and then grabbed an errant Soquel pass near mid-court and dribbled in for a lay-up that tied the game 27-27 at halftime. Hunter finished the first half with 14 points.
The game see-sawed back and forth in the third quarter, before Clay Tol scored on consecutive trips down the floor with tip ins of missed shots. SC led 46-43 at the end of the third quarter. In the fourth quarter SC took over using defensive pressure that caused nine turnovers in the first two minutes. Theodosis drained a 3-pointer and Tayo Enna stole an inbounds pass and scored a lay-up that swelled SC’s lead to 53-44 with three minutes left. Hunter put in his final two points after his fourth steal and a breakaway lay-up at the two minute mark.

February 15. SC 65, SLV 56. Nick Theodosis scored 24 points and SC held the Cougars in check for most of the first half, holding them to 16 points, while SC scored 19 points in the second quarter. SC is now 11-1 in league.

Feb. 21. SCCAL PLAYOFFS. No Surprises In Semis. Theodosis Leads Santa Cruz Rout. Nick Theodosis has had his ups and downs this season, but he showed what he is capable of. Theodosis was on top of his game. He sparked his team during a second quarter run that broke Aptos’ back and sent SC within reach of their fourth straight SCCAL tournament title with a 69-48 win. While SC, the regular season champion would’ve beaten Aptos anyway, Theodosis helped put it away early with 12 second quarter points to key a 27-2 run that bridged the first and second quarters. Theodosis is a strong yet agile player and he displayed multiple talents in leading the fast break, playing aggressive defense and scoring some spectacular lay-ups after Aptos had taken a 13-12 lead. “He’s been focused the last week and a half of the season. He’s playing like he’s the best player in the league, which is what I’ve always believed he is,” said Newell..
Theodosis sporting a newly dyed yellow buzz cut was the games high scorer with 16 points, but had all of his second quarter points during a particular 20-0 run. On one sequence, he made a fast break lay-up, got the rebound on the other end and drove the length of the for a reverse, behind the head lay-up in traffic. In the second half, he had another incredible basket. He drove across the lane while juking defenders, then switched hands and laid the ball in with his left hand all in continuous motion.
“When we switched from a man defense to a zone, I think the guys were getting into the passing lanes. That allowed us to get out in the open more,” said Theodosis. Enna with ten points and Hunter with 11 were tenacious on defense and out muscled Aptos on the boards. Center Clay Tol swatted away five Mariner shots. Aptos continued to battle, closing to 13 points early in the fourth quarter, but SC has too many weapons and simply was far more athletic.

Feb. 22. IN SCCAL FINALS: Cougars Claim Share Of Title. SLV upset SC to share the SCCAL Co-Championship. It took SLV two overtimes, but in the end they got what they wanted by shocking SC 75-68 in a double overtime thriller at Cabrillo College. SLV spread the floor on offense and let their top scorer, who had 38 points in the game, turned him loose to work his magic in the middle, where did a lot of driving to the basket for sometimes difficult lay-ups. SLV led 32-26 at halftime.
SLV continued to spread the floor in the second half with scorer, point guard Huemoeller stalling by dribbling or holding the ball near mid court with SLV clinging to a slim margin. He scored on a lay up with 27 seconds left that swelled SLV’s lead to 62-57. But SC closed the game to 63-61 with five seconds left, behind Tayo Enna’s three pointer. SLV made a free throw and then Theodosis sent the game into overtime with a spectacular buzzer beating three pointer that tied the game 64-64. Theodosis scored 19 points on the night.
Huemoeller nearly won the game in first overtime after stalling with the ball for more than three minutes as the SC fans booed. With five seconds left, Huemoeller split two Cards and his left handed lay up narrowly rolled off the rim. With 1:44 left in the second overtime, Huemoeller stole a SC inbound pass and drew a foul. He made two free throws to put his team up 68-66. SLV scored on a lay-up and Theodosis quickly answered with a lay up that made it 70-68 SLV. Five SLV free throws finished off the game.

Feb. 28. CCS PLAYOFFS. Theodosis Points Way To SC Boys CCS Victory. In a CCS Division III second round match-up between number four SC and number 20 Aragon remained a hard fought, nip and tuck battle for the first half. Then Theodosis took over. The shifty, blonde topped floor leader sliced and diced an overmatched Aragon squad into the ground, scoring 25 points, dishing out 10 assists and creating four steals in a 69-51 victory to advance SC into the quarterfinals. They will face number 12 Jefferson and upset victor over SLV. “We competed hard through most of the game. Theodosis was on the top of his game from the opening tip-off,” said Newell.
That was the bad news for the Dons a 13-13 undersized team that survived the first 16 minutes with solid outside shooting and just enough efforts in the offensive paint. At every point in the game, Aragon looked to be clawing back into the game, but Theodosis found a way to shut the door. In the first half Aragon scored a three pointer with 15 seconds left. Theodosis promptly grabbed the inbound pass, raced up court and answered back with a three pointer himself to put SC up 34-26 at intermission. Theodosis started the second half off with two quick threes from his favorite spot, before finding every possible way to knife through the Aragon defense. When he wasn’t putting it home himself, he dished off to a waiting Jermaine Hunter or Tayo Enna to finish it off.
Eventually it was SC’s interior strength that wore the Dons down. Clay Tol, Hunter, Enna and Marcel Jackson combined for 29 rebounds. Tol added three blocks and Jackson had two. Aragon had few inside opportunities without three or four SC arms honing in quickly as Newell switched to a zone defense that tightened up the creases considerably. “I think what helped us the most was our improved defense in the second half. I shot the ball well, but we really controlled things better defensively.” Theodosis said. SC won’t get the opportunity for a rematch with the team that upset them in double overtime in the SCCAL tournament final.

March 2. SC Boys Keep It Going. No 1 Hillsdale Next On CCS Playoff Trail. SC resume their march through the CCS Division III playoffs with a 60-45 win over Jefferson. SC 23-9 stomped over twelfth seeded Jefferson holding their star guard to nine points, while forwards Clay Tol and Jermaine Hunter had their way in the paint.
Several SC players including Demetrius Hunter and Theodosis, shadowed the star on the court, while Newell barked a stern reminder from the bench, “Where is he?” “Find number 24.” In the meantime, Tol and Hunter waited in ambush from their spots near the blocks. Hunter finished the game with 11 rebounds, while Tol had four blocked shots, 15 points and seven boards. SC led 19-9 at the first quarter and 31-18 at halftime.
Jefferson never got closer than 11 points in the second half. “Each game and each possession the stakes go up,” said Newell, who voiced some displeasure with his team in the huddle at the end of the first quarter. “We can’t afford to get a lead and then go to sleep. For the seven seniors, every time they lace up their shoes could be the last.” Theodosis scored 11 of his 13 points in the first half, grabbed four steals and passed off six assists. He gave the home crowd their moneys worth late in the game with an explosive move to the basket punctuated with a behind the back assist to Tyler Williams that made the score 57-39 with 2:15 remaining. Williams, a freshman, finished with four points, Tayo Enna had 11 and Jermaine Hunter added 12.

March 4. Sentinel Athlete of the Week was Nick Theodosis a 5-11, point guard helped led SC to the CCS Division III semifinals with two big playoff wins. Thursday, Theodosis scored 25 points, dished out 10 assists an grabbed four steals in a 69-51 victory over Aragon. Then Saturday in quarterfinal action, Theodosis help shut down Jefferson’s hot shooting guard, who entered the game averaging 35 points in two previous CCS games, but he only score nine points this game, while Theodosis put in 13 to go with six assists and four steal.

March 5. The Showdown. Cards Face Off Against Unbeaten Hillsdale In Section Semifinals. As early as last summer, Coach Newell knew the road to the CCS championship would go through Hillsdale High. Their five starters had been playing together since fifth or sixth grade. They are confident in each other’s abilities and they don’t panic and they don‘t lose.” At least not yet. Hillsdale is 25-0 and the states only undefeated team. They’ve already beaten SC this season 48-39 in the preseason Pinewood Tournament. SC had jumped out to a 20-10 lead, but then turned ice cold down the stretch. “We’re a much better team now. It was early and we hadn’t gotten things together as a team,” said Theodosis. SC finished the season strong, winning 14 of its last 16 contest and went 11-1 in the SCCAL. They did it with defense, routinely holding teams under 50 points per game.

March 6. Cool Knights Rip Cards. Hillsdale Too Much For Santa Cruz In 61-38 Win. Possessing all the intangibles of a championship team, the unbeaten Hillsdale Knights wore down SC, pulling away with a 61-38 win n the CCS Division III semifinals. SC was in the game, trailing 22-19 with four minutes remaining in the second quarter and by ten early in the fourth. Hillsdale closed out the game with a 15-2 run that iced any SC hopes of an upset. In their 15 point run, Hillsdale made 13 of 13 foul shots.
SC finished the season with a solid 23-10 record and a SCCAL championship. But SC seemed to lack one or two key ingredients that world beaters possess. “They played hard all game and we didn’t play up to their level,” said forward Jermaine Hunter. “They played with a championship intensity level. We played with quarterfinal intensity.” Hillsdale isn’t loaded with super stars or overpowering size. They all handled the ball, shot and passed with skill.
Leading the Hillsdale attack with bulldog intensity was their smallish point guard. Matching him highlight for highlight was SC point man Nick Theodosis. The two guards put on a clinic of penetration, anticipation and savvy passing. Theodosis made several passes of the no look variety that led to layups and audible gasps from the crowd. But Theodosis opposite had stronger support from his team on this night. Theodosis scored 16 points, but was the only Card to reach double figures. The closes were Hunter and center Clay Tol with six each. The two Card big men each grabbed seven rebounds.
Sophomore center Marcel Jackson came off the bench to block two shots and pin another against the backboard for an impressive goal tending call. But it wasn’t enough. SC needed more players to come up big. “This is the best game we’ve played this year,” said Hillsdale coach Bill Wilkin, who has coached the team for 27 years. “Our players do a lot of things that don’t show up in the scorebook. We’re very quick, we play as a team and our player have good heads on their shoulders.”
Both coaches pointed to a two minute span late in the second period as the turning point. With SC trailing 17-16, Hillsdale had a 14-5 run that culminated with a shot at the buzzer that made the halftime score 31-21 Hillsdale. For Newell, there was consolation in losing to a superb team and in the fact that his team overcame some early season hurdles to enjoy a solid year. “We faced many challenges throughout the season. Our seniors kept the team together and kept it moving in the right direction,” Newell said.

March 4. Nick Theodosis a 5-11, senior, point guard was selected the PLAYER OF THE YEAR, by the League coaches. Two Cards were picked for the first team ALL SCCAL squad. They were 6-5, senior, forward Jermaine Hunter and 6-5, senior, forward Tayo Enna. On the second team was 6-6, senior, center Clay Tol.
Hunter led the league in rebounding with 9.7 per game, while scoring 8.8 points a game. Enna scored 10.9 points a game. Tol grabbed seven rebounds a game and averaged 7.2 points a game for a well balance Cardinal team.
Theodosis Given Nod From Coaches. A natural progression toward greatness seemed to be inevitable for Nick Theodosis. So being named the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League’s most valuable player this season does not at all seem surprising. Early on in his career, honors dotted the resume of the star point guard for Santa Cruz High School.
It started in 1995 when he was named All-County sophomore of the year, scoring 14.5 points per game and earning second-team all-league honors. His encore the following year included leading the league in scoring at 17.3 points per game. He was named All-County junior of the year, earning first-team all-league honors and setting himself up for a spectacular senior season.
But admittedly, his final season at Santa Cruz started with a loud thud. The Cardinals lost five of their first nine games and Theodosis spent much of the time on the bench. Battling some personal problems and trying to find equal ground with SC coach Pete Newell, Theodosis eventually left the team for a brief tine. “There were things off the court I was going through and it carried over the basketball,” Theodosis said. “Coach and I straightened things out, though. We put things behind us a long time ago.” Once at 9-7, the Cardinals finished the season on a 14-2 clip (including 11-1 in the SCCAL) and Theodosis was a huge reason behind the resurgence.
Santa Cruz is the only local team still alive in the Central Coast Section playoffs (they play undefeated Hillsdale on Wednesday in the Division III semi finals). “I’m pleased that he was recognized for what he is–the best player in the league,” said Newell, who gushes over his point guard’s leadership. “Certainly he is our most valuable player. He’s been able to stay focused and that’s the key.” Theodosis, who averaged 14.7 points per game this year, could not say he was surprised at his honor but didn’t think he should have won it.

Sentinel ALL COUNTY Most Valuable Player was Nick Theodosis. Jermaine Hunter and Tayo Enna were selected to the first team. Clay Tol was on the second team. Hunter was the top rebounded in the league with 252 rebounds for a 9.7 average per game and a high game of 22.

March 4. Nick Theodosis a 5-11, senior, point guard was selected the PLAYER OF THE YEAR, by the League coaches. Two Cards were picked for the first team ALL SCCAL squad. They were 6-5, senior, forward Jermaine Hunter and 6-5, senior, forward Tayo Enna. On the second team was 6-6, senior, center Clay Tol.

JV BOYS BASKETBALL League record 4-8.
Yearbook. The Cards play consisted of excellent sportsmanship and non stop determination. Despite heavy competition and preseason losses, they continued to play with heart and intensity and were in ever game to the end.

The Sentinel recognized a number of sophomores who led the young Cards, including: Sonny Ramirez, second team all league; Niya Levi, all league defensive team. Colvin Marshal and Sager Chowlera earned honorable mentions. Rest of team: Mike Croghan, Antonio Pozos, Eli Wilson, Lloyd Mueller, Nick Pao, Eli Karon and Morgan Pena. Coach Charles Burks.

FROSH BASKETBALL League record 2-10.
Yearbook. Their record didn’t stop them from playing hard and having a good time. Standout players included: Nick Fleming, George Czechowski, Anthony Gonzales, Dejuan Williams and Matt Cohen. Rest of the team: Mike McDonald, Andrew Ackerman, Jordon Hunter, Jamie Quartararo, Gabe Crafts, Cory Atkins, Marlin Henton, Matt Foster and Matt Telega. Coach Jimmy Cahill.

Trident, January 30. Freshman Boys Basketball Building For The Future. So far the team is 1-3 in league. The win over Monte Vista, started when George Czechowski drove for the hoop and freed up Matt Cohen in the corner, who made the winning three point shot with 1.7 seconds left on the clock. Two 1996 grads, Nich Thompson and Jimmy Cahill are the new coaches.

GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL UNDEFEATED LEAGUE CHAMPIONS 12-0.
SC 26-3 overall won its third straight SCCAL title and went 12-0 for the second straight undefeated league title.
Practice games: Santa Teresa 45-40, Gilroy 46-38, Leland won, North Monterey 47-42. Pioneer Tournament: took third place. Sixteen team Mitty Tournament, beat Independence 51-42 won the consolation title. Leland 52-43. (games missing) Sentinel, 11-2 preseason record.
League: Harbor 58-39, 44-41; Aptos 64-41, 65-45; Monte Vista 69-57, 51-41; Watsonville 44-33, won; Soquel 56-32, 59-34; SLV 53-25, won. League record 12-0 for SCCAL round robin title. In the SCCAL playoffs beat Soquel 52-35 and Monte Vista in the finals 49-35 for undisputed SCCAL title. In the CCS playoffs James Lick 62-28, lost to St. Ignatius in the quarterfinals.

League standings by school, overall record and league record
SCHOOL OVER LEA
SC 26-3 12-0
Monte Vista 16-8 9-3
Harbor 16-9 9-3
Aptos 9-18 4-8
Soquel 8-14 3-9
Watsonville 8-18 3-9
SLV 8-16 2-10

Yearbook. With ten returning players from last years champions and five strong additions, the girls remained unstoppable all season long. Through multiple injuries and illnesses the Cardinal girls never failed to pull out of their slumps and do what they do best-win! “Throughout the season, we had two goals; to go undefeated and to win the league championship. I can now look at our accomplishments and appreciate all the time that we put in for them,” stated junior post Corina Tom. Senior guard Jenny Croghan hopes for more, like winning CCS. Junior Jami Ross was selected by the coaches as the league point guard of the year.

Roster: Andrea Consiglio, Soji Howe, Ella Harley, Jami Ross, Amelia Mitcalf, Jenny Croghan, Kali Cambell, Danielle Willis, May Reidt, Hop Anderson, Diana Willis, Elena Russel-Nava, Tess Bridgeman, Tricia Hall and Corina Tom.
Head Coach Silviana Gaona and assistants, Monique Jones, Danny Paz and Todd.

Sentinel preseason write up. League Tries To Stay healthy Enough To Run With Santa Cruz. SC returns ten players from last season’s 12-0 league champions. Transfer additions are Danielle Willis of Harbor and Adrea Consiglio of SLV. The glimmer of a third straight SCCAL title begins to dance in coach Silviano Gaona’s eyes. But this year’s title prize doesn’t seem to be in the SC trophy case just yet. There seems to be improvement coming for some of the teams.

Sentinel. November 30. SC 45, Santa Teresa 40. SC got a dominate performance from Soji Howe, who scored 23 points and grabbed 12 rebounds to move the Cards to a 2-0 record. Hope Anderson helped the cause with eight rebounds and Jami Ross and Jenny Croghan each added six rebounds.

December 14. SC 46, Gilroy 38. SC started out slow, but outscored Gilroy 16-8 in the fourth quarter to pull away and improve to 6-1 on the season. Soji Howe had nine points and grabbed six rebounds. Kali Campbell had nine points, Jamie Ross added six points and four rebounds. SC led 21-19 at halftime. “Our intensity was not as high as usual. But we were able to get things done when we needed to,” said coach Silviano Gaona

December 22. SC 47, North Monterey 42. SC at 7-1 played the game the way they wanted. “I was real happy with the intensity we had. The focus of the game wasn’t on winning, but to go out there and leave it all on the court,” Coach Gaona said. Cori Tom led the scorers with nine points and Danielle Willis’ had six assists.

December 29. At the Mitty tournament involving 16 teams, the Cards advanced to the third place game by defeating Independence 51-42. Soji Howe scored 15 points and all 14 players saw action. “We missed some easy shots early and were really out of sync. But we picked it up and played good defense<“ said Coach Gaona.

January 5. SC 52, Leland 43. SC beat Leland for the second time in less than a week and used the game as a chance to get everyone playing time. “Leland has some aggressive, physical players. The intensity was very good. The important thing is we gave everyone some quality minutes,” coach Gaona. The Cards improved to 11-2 and Leland is 9-5. Kali Campbell was game high scorer with 14 points. Jenny Croghan had nine points and Soji Howe added eight points.

January 6. SCCAL Girls Preview Cards Holding a Stacked Deck. Santa Cruz Takes Aim at Third-straight SCAL Title.
Asked to give his best assessment of the pending Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League
Girls basketball season, Santa Cruz coach Silviano Gaona opted to stay within the safe confines of coach speak political correctness. But, rest assured, Gaona isn’t fooling anyone else around the league. The Cardinal’s deck is loaded and everyone knows it. “Their second five could very possible beat anyone in this league on any given day,” said Soquel coach John Wilson. “They easily go 10 deep off the bench.” And the Cardinals’ ability to wrack up and 11-2 preseason record against a schedule filled with few patsies suggests it could be a one-team race for league supremacy.
But Gaona isn’t openly buying into that theory just yet. “If you look at our record, then yes, maybe we are the favorites,” said Gaona. “But league is a whole new season and the girls know it. Everyone’s going to be shooting for us, circling us on their schedules and the big game. And there are a lot of good teams in this league.” On the other hand, though, Gaona admits he’s been impressed the way this year’s group has emerged from beneath forecasts of a potential rebuilding year to become a team that easily goes 10 deep. “We knew we had some talent, but mostly it was unproven talent, players that had very little varsity court experience,” said Gaona.
“We lost four quality players–two all-league players, including a two-time league MVP (Kelley Kaiser)–and not many of our returning players had played a lot last year.” But the once unproven have blossomed, and now Gaona has the artillery to throw a revolving door of relentless defensive pressure at opponents. And SCCAL foes know they will have to be ready. Harbor would certainly seem to be the one with the best chance of knocking off the Cardinals.

January 6. Sojourner Howe Is Bright, self-effacing, And Always Talks Team. True Talent. Soji Howe Takes Her Game To The Top.
Soji Howe is named after civil rights leader Sojouner Truth. Soji Howe could have coasted through the off season. Her team had won two straight league titles. She was a third team all league selection. As one of the two returning seniors, she was assured of being a big wheel on a road tested machine. But she also felt the usual wouldn’t take her where she wanted to go. So over the summer, Soji Howe took her game where it had never gone before–to the West Field House at UC Santa Cruz to play in men’s pickup games. Last year she played center for Santa Cruz High. At 5-feet-9 inches, she would not play center in a men’s pickup game. And that was the point. Howe knew she would play small forward this season and knew a summer of games at the West Field House against men would break her of a center’s habits. “I was one of the smallest players, so it forced me to improve my outside game,” she said.
“It was fun. They don’t expect you to do anything good, so when you do–swat a shot or hit a jumper–it’s kind of a shock.” On paper it may sound brash. Or unusual. To Howe it is neither. She wasn’t out to prove anything. There were skills she needed to improve, and playing in pickup games with men would provide a crash course. Sojourner Howe is bright, self-effacing, and always talks team. The real clue regarding her nature can be found in her name. It comes from the past, from a black woman who, in the 1850’s traveled the East and Midwest and spoke out eloquently and forcefully against slavery. Sojourner Truth preached a gospel of concern for others.
Soji Howe, 17, an only child raised by a single parent, is anything but a troubled loner. “Soji is very, very unselfish. She never complains about not getting enough minutes, she never complains about not getting enough shots,” said Santa Cruz Coach Silviano Gaona. “As long as the team is winning, she doesn’t care.”
The Cardinals won 20 games last season and went 12-0 in the Santa Cruz Athletic League. But with two time SCCAL Player of the Year Kelly Kaiser and first-team all leaguer Natalie Gibbons graduating, Gaona knew adjustments had to be made. Moving Howe from center to small forward definitely qualified as an adjustment. So far, the move has paid off. The Cardinals take an 11-2 record into league play and have defined themselves as the team to beat. The move worked and not because Howe spent a lot of time on her own playing against men and boys.
The team stuck together in the off season, most of them playing in summer leagues and making a trip together to San Diego. “Our whole team stays together and there’s not really much drop off from first to second teams,” said Howe. “Our third team is good.” Gaona throws at least 10 players per game at the opposition, revolving players onto the floor to fuel a pressure defense. This year, more than last, more players are scrambling for longer periods of time. A team requires a certain chemistry to pull it off. If would be unthinkable on the pro level, and is becoming increasingly rare on the collegiate level.
But in Howe, Gaona found an unselfish conduit, one that absorbs energy and has the rare capacity to spread it around. Howe is plenty human, though. She contemplates what might be in store for herself when finished with high school. But even in self-examination she remains somehow rooted in common sense. Sure, she comes from a championship program. Sure, she probably will be high on the all-league list.
But college recruiters aren’t banging on her door, and may not. The Solution? Simple, for now. Instead of walking on a Division I school in hopes of, first, making the team, they clinging to a spot on the bench, Howe says she hopes to attend a Division III school featuring a strong academic program and a need for women basketball players. “I would rather play on a team, than sit on a team,” is her current statement regarding her future in basketball.
But now is a good place to be. Her team is hot, she’s playing well, and the coach is happy. “Soji worked harder than any player on our team in the off season, and she didn’t have to,” said Gaona. “She’s so smart, and will play whatever you tell her. Every coach dreams of having six or seven players like her.”

January 7. Sentinel Athlete of the Week Kali Campbell a 5-8 junior point guard tallied 22 points and 10 rebounds in two Card victories this past week. But more importantly to Coach Gaona, Campbell has provided steady leadership from a position very new to her. Last year she was the Cards power forward. “To make that kind of adjustment, just shows what kind of athlete she is. Her first few games she seemed uncomfortable, but every week she keeps getting better,” Gaona said. Heading into SCCAL play, Campbell is averaging 7.2 points and 4.2 rebounds a game. But her biggest asset has been her ability to distribute.

January 7. The Top Ten teams in the Monterey Bay picked by the Sentinel and the Salinas Californian ranked SC as number one.

January 11. Cardinals Explosive Start Stuns Pirates. Danielle Willis, wearing a SC red and white jersey after transferring from Harbor, celebrated her own homecoming at Harbor high, by sparking the Cards to a 58-39 SCCAL victory. “It definitely got our team motivated. I’m really good friends with a lot of the girls over there. I wasn’t really worried about playing good or bad, I wanted to play good defense,” said Willis of her old stomping grounds. SC using a tenacious full court press, grabbed a 24-5 first quarter lead with Willis leading the way with six points and three steals.
Coach Gaona thought Willis and the rest of the team played a solid game under what could have been distracting circumstances. Danielle was focused and played an outstanding defensive game tonight. As a team that first quarter was the best quarters of basketball I think we have played all year,” Gaona said. Willis finished with 11 points and four rebounds. Soji Howe led the Cards in scoring with 12. She and Kali Campbell were extremely active early. In the final minute of the first quarter, Howe set up a Campbell basket with a steal, grabbed an offensive rebound and scored on a tough inside lay-up. Campbell had 11 points and seven steals. Harbor scored three consecutive baskets to get within 37-16 at halftime. Harbor out scored SC 14-10 in the third quarter and 23-21 in the second half.

January 15. SC 64, Aptos 41. SC 2-0 and 13-2 overall effectively pressed from the outset and Aptos was never in the game. Defense was the key to this game. Even when Aptos broke the press, they rarely got off a good shot and were stung by several shot clock violations, plus not being able to rebound. SC had 27 offensive rebounds and 65 shots to Aptos’ 37 shots. Kali Campbell had 15 points and Soji Howe had nine rebounds.

January 17. Cardinal’s Depth Brings Tough Win Over MVC. After SC dug out a tough 69-57 win over Monte Vista Christian, the Mustangs served notice that they aren’t about to be pushovers. SC 3-0, 14-2 took over possession of first place in the SCCAL, while MVC 3-1 in league and 10-6 overall dropped into second place. The game was much closer than the final score indicates as both teams, which fought for the championship last year, continue to grow and form an entertaining rivalry. Leading 47-46 with seven minutes to play in the fourth quarter, SC with its deep bench started to wear down MVC.
Nine players scored for SC as coach Gaona substituted liberally in order to make MVC with just nine players, work even harder. After Kali Campbell nailed a trey for a 50-46 lead, SC appeared ready to take control of the game. Four free throws by Cori Tom and a jumper by Hope Anderson pushed the lead to 57-48. SC continued to make free throws down the stretch, including 12 for 20 in the fourth quarter. MVC attempted just 15 free throws in the game. It wasn’t a matter of biased refereeing as much as it was the simple truth that SC pounded the ball down low. The Cards attempted 41 free throws, sinking 23, as Tom, Anderson, Jami Ross and Danielle Willis dominated the paint.
At the outset, the Mustangs controlled the game taking a 11-4 lead. Gaona took a time out to remind his team that MVC is a legitimate threat to dethroning his team. “We were definitely not ready. It’s nice to be loose before the game, but we were not focused. But because of our depth, we were fresher at the end and we were able to pull out the game,’ Gaona said. SC received 30 points of the bench led by Jenny Croghan’s 11, Anderson’s 10, Elena Russel-Nava’s 8, included three straight baskets in the first quarter that got SC back into the game. SC was behind the entire first half, but finally took its first lead of the game when Campbell sank two free throws with no time left in the first half. Campbell led SC with 12 points and hauled down seven rebounds.
But it was the play of Tom down the stretch as she pulled down seven of her team high 11rebouds to go along with her11 points, including 7 for 7 from the free throw line. “We went into the game thinking it was going to be easy, but we pulled it off at the end. We got ourselves back into the game mentally before it was too late,” said Tom. Gaona was proud of Tom’s effort on the night. “Cori does a lot for our team, even when she’s not scoring. She is a complete player and such a tough player,” said Gaona.

January 19. SC 44, Watsonville 33. The game was knotted 21-21 at halftime, but SC slowed down the game and wore down the Wildcats with a zone defense in the second half. Elena Russel-Nava paced the Cards 4-0, 15-2 with ten points and eight rebounds, Kali Campbell added nine rebounds. Coach Gaona said the play of Jenny Croghan, especially on the defensive end was instrumental for the Cards.

January 22. SC Girls Turn On Pressure. Defeat Soquel 56-32. From the opening tip until the closing buzzer, members of the SC girls team roll up their sleeves and get dirty playing the lost art of defense. Using athleticism and depth, the Cards wear down befuddled opponents, who more often than not blow up under pressure. It happened again as the visiting Cards played like a pack of wolves against Soquel. SC opened the game on a 8-0 run, holding the hosts without a point for the first five and a half minutes, before rolling to a 56-32 win. “That’s our game.” said coach Gaona, whose team improved to 5-0 in league and 16-2 overall. Because we have good athletes and a lot of depth, we can wear teams down with our defense.” Soquel closed the gap to 23-17 at the half.
After intermission, SC rolled out of the locker room with a full court press. It proved fatal as SC won on a 21-7 run and never looked back. “They keep coming at you. They go ten deep and they all are aggressive, all run the floor and all shoot and rebound. You can’t make too many mistakes against them,” said Soquel coach John Wilson (formerly coached SC in the same manner) A team effort, led by one exceptional player in Danielle Willis. The sophomore guard scored 18 points, grabbed six rebounds and drove Soquel ball handlers batty and produced a game high nine steals. With her seemingly limitless energy, Willis set the tone for SC on the defensive end and Soquel eventually crumbled. “Teams expend a lot of energy breaking the press. By the third or fourth quarters, we still have fresh legs because of our depth. It’s a nice luxury to have,” Gaona said. SC suits 15 players and nine scored. Soji Howe and Kali Campbell each tallied ten points and Howe had six rebounds.

January 25. Santa Cruz Girls Push Past SLV. Ameilia Mitcalf paced the Cards past SLV 53-25 in her first start of the season. Mitcalf scored nine points and had nine rebounds as SC improved to 6-0. Diana Willis scored four points and played solid defense. Point guard Tricia Hall had six rebounds and six assists to lead the Cards. “It’s nice to see some of the other players come in and play well. These girls practice and play hard every day. They deserve to play,” said Gaona. SC built a 25-7 halftime lead behind great defensive pressure and a relentless full court press.

Trident, January 30. Ten girls return from last years championship team. The team has a pile of players, who could be starting on any other team. The skills this team has can be traced to a lot of hard work in the off season. They played in two leagues this summer and also drove to San Diego for the Jack’n The Box Tournament with over 90 teams participating The girls got the experience of playing teams from all over the West Coast, plus the state champions of Arizona and an all star team from Canada. Many players participated in open gym over the summer.
The Sentinel has SC as the number one team in the Monterey Bay and the San Jose Mercury has them ranked fifteenth in the entire Bay Area. So far the team is 4-0 in league and 15-2 overall. In preseason the girls took third place at the Pioneer Tournament and were consolation champs of the 16 team Mitty Tournament. So far in league every player has gotten to play in every game. The players coming off the bench have all contributed. Amelia Mitcalf has done a good job of looking for scoring opportunities. Despite limited playing time, she has scored seven points against Aptos and three points in the Harbor win.

February 1. Santa Cruz, Harbor Hook Up For A Thriller. Whatever the Santa Cruz-Harbor game lacked in style points, it more than made up for in drama and excitement. SC came away with a 44-41 win, putting a little more distance between themselves and the rest of the league. SC is now 7-0 in league and 18-2 overall. Harbor is 5-3 and 12-9. The last time the two met, SC jumped to leads of 17-4, 30-7 and eventually won 72-49. This time the Pirates hung tight, fell back and then made a miraculous, highly entertaining fourth period comeback. “I told the girls after the game that Harbor is a real good team. We did a better job moving the ball against their zone in the second half and Soji Howe saved us on a few possessions in the first half,” said coach Gaona. Howe led all scorers with 14 points, but came up big in the first half, when Harbor led and was gunning for more. With Harbor leading 16-13, Howe grabbed an offensive rebound and made a lay-up. In fact she made the same play again to finally give SC a 19-16 lead at halftime, when she grabbed a teammates errant shot and put it back at the buzzer. It was a half court, low shooting percentage affair.
Harbor handled the SC press the entire game, but in the second half often turned the ball over in the half court set. Harbor committed nine turnovers in the third period and nine in the fourth, while SC gave the ball away only once in the entire third period. SC led 31-24 at the end of third period and extended it to 44-33 with five minutes remaining in the game. The game appeared over.
Miraculously, Harbor came back and had a chance to tie the game with 10 seconds left. The capper on Harbor’s scrambling 9-2 run in the final two minutes was a three pointer to tighten the score up to 44-41. Kali Campbell had seven assists and Jamie Ross grabbed nine rebounds. In the end Gaona was glad to get the win. He hopes the tight game experience will help his team somewhere down the road. “You don’t want your wake up call to come in the last game of the season. Hopefully we can use this for experience,” Gaona said.

February 5. SC 65, Aptos 45. SC controlled the boards and in turn the game as they bolted to a 34-18 half time lead to remain unbeaten in the SCCAL at 8-0. Leaders were Kali Campbell and Danyell Willis, who each poured in 12 points. Jamie Ross added ten points and ten rebounds. Aptos coach, “They’re big and strong and controlled the game with their rebounding.”

February 7. SC 51, Monte Vista 41. SC played sloppy, but held the Mustangs star to four points for the game to maintain their perfect league record. “They have some good players, but she’s definitely their best. One of our goals was to force her to work as hard as possible,” Gaona said. Gaona relegated the task to several players, but said defensive specialist Ella Harley did a fantastic job guarding the star in the second half. Soji Howe finished with 18 points for SC, who is 8-0 and 20-2. Monte Vista is 8-2 and 15-7. Monte Vista held a one point lead early in the fourth quarter. “It was a sloppy game. We definitely need to start executing better before CCS starts,” said Gaona.

February 12. SC 59, Soquel 34. Amy Reidt broke open a four point game by hitting two shots at the outset of the third quarter to lead SC on a 18-9 surge. Coach Gaona said, SC improved its defensive intensity in the second half, which created more of a full court game, which is the Cards preferred style of play. Six SC players scored between 5 and 11 points, led by Soji Howe with 11. Soquel outscored SC 12-6 in the second quarter. It was the fourteenth straight win for SC, which is now 11-0 in league and 22-2 overall.

Santa Cruz Cruises Past Soquel 52-35 in the semifinals of the SCCAL playoffs. Imagine looking at the scoreboard at halftime and seeing only six points for your side. Undefeated SC handed Soquel perhaps their worst half of the season. This is how bad it got. Fourteen consecutive possessions without a point in a seven minute stretch, followed by another 9:24 minutes without a field goal. To make it worse, Soquel didn’t have an offensive rebound throughout the first half and had 20 turnovers during the same span. SC, in contrast, had only four turnovers. SC simply manhandled Soquel, a traditionally losing program that has made strides under first year coach John Wilson, who preceded current coach Si;viano Gaona at SC. The Knights finished with their best record since 1991-92.
The game started tied 2-2, then SC scored 18 unanswered points by applying a tenacious pressure defense, moving the ball around offensively with swift pinpoint passing. It was no coincidence that Soquel switched to a pressure defense in the second quarter to stem the momentum, but still stared a 27-6 halftime deficit. “We wanted to come out and be ready to play. You could tell the girls were ready,” said Gaona. Soji Howe scored ten of her game high 14 points in the first half, but SC overwhelmed Soquel by shifting players in and out of the lineup to keep them fresh and the rout continued. It was the same system SC used in wearing out Monte Vista by 10 and 12 point margins during the regular season.

February 22. SC GIRLS COME OUT ON TOP. Card Girls Shine Again. You can take away two of their crucial players and take away their most familiar game plan, but what can’t seem to be wrestled away from SC by any amount of effort, will power or even sheer luck is the title of “Best in the SCCAL.” MVC’s third attempt of the season to blemish the Cards perfect league season record went the way of attempts one and two, solid effort, good showing, but nothing doing against a deeper an more sizeable SC team. The result SC 49, MVC 35. The real story: SC 25-2 won its third straight SCCAL title and second straight undefeated league title.
Ten girls from last years CCS Division III quart-finalist returned to help produce yet another banner in the rafters of Fehliman Gym and for Coach Gaona. “I don’t care what league your in, to go through league play without a loss two straight years in a row is an accomplishment to be commended. All these girls have worked very hard for this,” Gaona said.
The Cards were a living, breathing, manic rebounding testament to Gaona’s statement. SC out rebounded MVC 58-21. That is not a typo. But it was, for the most part, the story of the game. That and the fact that the Cards played their second straight game without Danielle Willis and Amy Reidt, two of the cogs in their full court pressing operation, because of flu. SC has made a habit of eating opposing guards alive by virtue of their full court trap, but without a full complement of able bodies, Gaona didn’t feel he could afford to use it.
“Danielle is crucial, because she usually splits time with Kali Campbell at the point. And without her, Kali has to play a lot of minutes and it just would have worn her out too much,” Gaona said. Santa Cruz opted to apply pressure in the half court instead and seemed none the worse for it. By using their size advantage inside, SC usually had three players over 5-10 to MVC’s one at all times. The Cards were able to get just enough extra fingertips on balls to pull them in and feed them forward in transition.
When they weren’t running, SC used a balanced inside, outside game that simply wore down the Mustangs over the course of the game. “When you only grab 21 rebounds in a game, it’s going to be hard to win,” said the MVC coach. MVC was down only seven points at halftime, but the deficit slowly increased over the second 16 minutes.
It wasn’t because MVC wasn’t in there battling, SC’s size and depth was just too much. SC was just getting those extra tips on crucial loose balls. Senior Soji Howe was her steady self, the workhorse inside and out, scored a team high 14 points and grabbed a team high 15 rebounds. Cori Tom, also put in a nicely balanced performance, with 14 points and 13 rebounds.
But it was the combined work of Tom, Howe, Hope Anderson with 11 rebounds and Jami Ross with 9 rebounds that left the Mustangs with virtually no second chances. Last year SC the second seed at the CCS Division III lost in the quarterfinals to St. Ignatius. “We’re playing really well right now matter who’s on the floor. This is a great way to move into CCS,” said Tom.

February 28. CCS Basketball Playoffs. Cards Turn It On. Slow Start Can’t Stop SC Girls’ Domination. SC picked the darndest time to play its worst half of basketball all season in its CCS Division III match-up with visiting James Lick with a 22-5 record. Fortunately for SC, an awful first half still equated to a six point lead. The top seeded Cards turned back into the dominate force it had been all season and still won the game by a comfortable 34 points. The score 62-28. “Was that the worst half of basketball you’ve ever seen?” said Coach Gaona.
SC moves on to play number eight seed St. Ignatius a 42-39 winner over number ninth seed Palo Alto, Saturday at Cabrillo College. Soji Howe named the ALL SCCAL MVP rebounded from a 4 point first half to score 13 in the second half and led the Cards running attack. Howe kick started a 30-4 run with three consecutive transition lay-ups keyed by a reinvigorated defense and relentless SC pressure on the defensive boards. Cori Tom, Jamie Ross and Howe combined for 27 rebounds. Point guard Kali Campbell finished with nine assists. Only one of the Cards second half scores came from further out than five feet. That was a three pointer by Tom, who finished with 16 points. The most surprising thing of the night was the Cards susceptibility to the Comets full court pressure the first half.

Sentinel ALL COUNTY . Soji Shows ‘Em Howe It’s Done. Santa Cruz Star Soji Howe Tops ALL COUNTY team as the Player of the Year. Coach Silviano Gaona is the Coach of the Year. Senior, forward, Soji Howe is also on the ALL COUNTY first team. SC has two players on the second team. Junior, 5-7, point guard, Kali Campbell and junior, 5-8, forward Cori Tom. Often this season, Soji Howe was not the most gifted player on the court. She is not blessed with a natural, fluid shot. She doesn’t shoot from behind the three point stripe and in fact is amused by the notion. She’s not a dazzling ball handler. She never is the quickest player on the court.
When games started, Howe often remained on the periphery of focus while flashy and players with emotion lurking close to the surface frantically attempted to establish a fire. But when the flash burned out, often within minutes, Howe began her quiet destruction of an opponent’s game. The offensive rebound and put-in off a teammate’s desperate shot; the dribble down the heart of the court and pass for a layup; the defensive hand in the face; constantly getting a hand on the ball–these are the tools of Howe’s game. They are the wrench and pliers of the old-school game. Guaranteed for life. No matter how much torque and pressure you put on them, they aren’t going to break.
“Soji is proof that the best player is often the hardest worker,” said Santa Cruz coach Silviano Gaona. “She is not the biggest or the quickest player on the floor, but she works harder than anyone. “It’s heart. She just plays harder and never takes a break, she never lets our defense rest. She leads by example.” Howe’s statistics are near the top of the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League, but not gaudy by any means. She averaged 10.4 points each game, sixth in the league, and 7.5 rebounds per game, fifth in the league. Her number are good. Not spectacular.
What drives Howe are the intangibles coaches dream of in a player. She is a tenacious defender. Unselfish. Doesn’t talk trash. Gets the ball to the hot shooter. Will play any position the team needs. “For a while, in the beginning of the season, I was in a rut. It took me a while to get into a rhythm. I think there was one game where I took two shots,” Howe said. “But I don’t mind letting others take over the game.” It never really happened. Others may have had a fabulous game, but Howe’s effort on each end of the floor had a large part in the Cardinals going 26-3 on the season.
She may not be a highlight film type of player. But Howe’s quiet intensity and consistently high caliber of play was not lost on other coaches in the league, who voted her the player of the year. “She worked so hard the last two summers, she is really deserving of this,” Wilson said. “My last year at Santa Cruz, Pete Newell (SC boys coach) pointed at Howe at practice one day and said ’she’s going to be an all-star.’”

GIRLS JV BASKETBALL LEAGUE CHAMPIONS 11-1 record.
Yearbook. Roster: Crystal Santos, Kendyll Whiting, Jill Thompson, Marissa Boyce, Paige Nutt, Tracey Baldwin, Lily Mandel, Adrienne Cramer and Kelly Howell. Coaches Reed Larson and Barbara Christenson.

Trident, January 30. Despite having only nine players, the JV team is off to a excellent start going undefeated in league with a 5-0 record so far. The team is quick, runs an effective press and has the height advantage over other teams. Handily defeating Harbor, Monte Vista, Aptos and Watsonville and having a closer game against Soquel, the girls are half way to their goal of winning league. The following girls are over 6 feet tall: Sophomores Tracey Baldwin, Adrienne Cramer, Kelly Howell, Lily Mandel and Jill Thompson, plus freshman Marisa Boyce. That leaves only three girls on the team who are less the 6 feet. They are Paige Nutt, Cristal Santos and Kendyll Whiting.

FROSH-SOPH BASKETBALL Trident, January 30. For the first time SC has a third team to accommodate the number of girls, who want to play basketball. We have a strong, fast breaking offense, led by Rachael Thompson and Megan Kennedy at the point. Jynell Crutch and Jennifer Cardoza are on the wings and the boards are dominated by strong inside play from Aurora Malades, Amanda Moreland and Alicia Piffero. The teams, ‘person to person’ defense, has continually shut down opponents. In several games, the team has held the other teams to single digits in the first quarter. At the Watsonville Tournament the team won the consolation title. The first game was a loss to Salinas, but the next two games were wins. In league the team is 2-1 and overall 9-3. The coach Paul Shantz was the leading scorer for UCSC last year.

WRESTLING
At the team SCCAL dual championships the Cards went 1-4 as a team for fifth place.

Yearbook. Having the smallest team in the league and new coaches, the Cards turned some heads sending Ryan Deane, Boris Quintanilla, Travis Rowland and Luke Pomerantz to postseason CCS competition. Matt Windt seemed to sum up the season best when he said, “We had a lot of young wrestlers, but still had champion like hearts.” Rest of roster: Manny Kester, Carl Lund, Nick Lezin and John Laughlin. Coaches Lacjic and Leland.

Trident, December 18. Wrestling Preview. At the helm this year is former Stanford coach Bill Leland and National Freestyle Champion and Olympic team member Tim Lasjic. They bring a great combination of coaching styles which is sure to bring out the best in all the wrestlers this year. Back are two CCS qualifiers from last year, senior Travis Rowland and junior Ryan Deane. In the first tournament of the year, they both took second places in their respective weight classes. Boris Quintanilla is back after a year off. Boris started the season off with a strong third place finished at the Blossom Hill Invitational and won an award for the most pins thanks to his signature move, “The Stack.“ The newest addition to the team is junior Matt Windt. At the novice tournament Matt put his opponents shoulders to the mat and notched a quality first place finish.

(The end of the season has been moved up to show the most successful wrestlers first.)
February 16. It’s Status Quo At League Wrestling Finals. The top three places qualify for the CCS championships next week. SC had one individual champion in Boris Quintanilla at the 135 division where he continued his dominance with a first period win. At the 171 pound division Ryan Deane took second place. In the 103 division, Luke Pomerantz was third. At 215, Travis Rowland lost in the opening minutes of overtime 6-5 for second place. All four wrestlers will represent SC at CCS next week.

February 17. Local Wrestlers Seeded In CCS Tournament. Boris Quintanilla was the only Card seeded. He was give the number six seed at 135 pounds.

February 22. Local Wrestler Excel At CCS. (at the top of the write up was info on SC’s Quintanilla) SC’s Boris Quintanilla upset the number two seed in the opening day of the CCS wrestling championships. Quintanilla the sixth seed at 135 earned a pair of pins in his first two matches Friday morning, before an overtime upset of a North Monterey wrestler 7-5. “Boris has come so far this season. He’s an intense competitor and is getting seasoned now,” coach Leland said. He will take the mat against the number three seed Saturday at 10 a.m. Travis Rowland at 215, went 2-1 and will return in the consolation bracket Saturday.

February 23. Five SCCAL wrestlers will advance to the State Meet at UOP in Stockton next week. Boris Quintanilla at 135 dropped his semifinal match, but recovered by pinning the same North Monterey wrestler he defeat the day before, but this time by a pin, which qualified him for the State meet for taking third place.

Trident, January 30. Wrestling Going For The Pin. A review of the top wrestlers this year. Travis Rowland at 215 pounds was the SCCAL champion last year and did well at CCS. This year he took second at the Blossom Hill Invitational and third at the Artichoke Invitational.
Boris Quintaneilla is returning after taking a year off. He took third place in both the Artichoke and Lone Star Invitational and third at the Blossom Hill Invitational. Boris is one of the team leaders and is always there to cheer his teammates to victory.
Luke Pomerantz is the lightweight on the team, weighing in a strong 103. Small in size, but huge in heart and intensity. Luke is one wrestler, who never gives up until the match is ended and always does his best.
Matt Windt is a first year wrestler, but has a double leg takedown of a champion. In his first tourney, the Novice Tournament, he placed first and has gotten better ever since. Weighing in at 160, he is a top contender for the league title.

Sentinel. December 9. Card Wrestlers Excel At Tourney. SC hit the mat among some of the best wrestler in the area and held its own. SC finished tenth out of sixteen teams in a tournament that featured last years CCS champion Gilroy and perennial power Oak Grove. “It was an opportunity to get kids working against some good competition. I think we have a good group that can really go a long way this season,” said coach Bill Leland. Travis Roland placed second in the 215 pound division and Ryan Deane was second at 189. Boris Quintanilla fell to a Gilroy wrestler by a single point in the 135 division and wound up third overall. Quintanilla notched three pins along the way.

January 26. Santa Cruz Grappler Wins Tourney at 135. Boris Quintanilla beat the top two seeds, in two close victories, to win the 135 division at the Mt. Eden Invitational Tournament. Quintanilla, a junior, earned his first tournament championship this season, by beating the number one seed in the semifinals 11-10 and the number two seed in the final 4-2 on a takedown in overtime. He had trailed 2-0 in the final, before tying the score with a pair of escapes. Quintanilla’s performance highlighted the Cards seventh place finish out of 22 teams.
He did not wrestle last year. Matt Windt, a junior wrestling for the first time, went 3-1 to finish fifth at 160. Windt’s only loss came in the first round.

February 9. At the team SCCAL dual championships held at SC, the Cards went 1-4 as a team. All six teams at the league were involved. SC came in fifth. For coach Bill Leland, who brought only eight wrestlers, the dual matches were a chance to get his kids quality time on the mat. “We had some individuals do well. And we’ve got to see it as a chance to get better individually,” Leland said. Boris Quintanilla was 5-0 with four pins at 135 pounds. Travis Rowland at 215 was also perfect in his five matches. “We’re just putting the core of the team in place. There are some real strong individuals in the league,” Leland said.

BOYS VARSITY SOCCER LEAGUE CHAMPIONS.
SC’s first soccer championship since 1988-89 reached the CCS Division II semifinals for the schools best finish since 1990-91. This team beat powerful Watsonville twice in three meets. Coach Sierra directed the team to a 20-1-2 regular season record.

Practice games: Watsonville tournament: Aptos 5-1, North Monterey 2-1, Gilroy 2-1, final with Watsonville won. Tourney champs.
League games: Aptos 5-0, 5-0; Soquel 6-1, 3-0; Monte Vista 7-0, won: Harbor 3-1, 3-0; SLV 5-0, 4-1; Watsonville 3-2, loss. League record 11-1. CCS quarterfinal, Half Moon Bay 2-1. Semifinals lost to Pioneer. Overall record 20-1-2.

Trident, December 18. The dedicated squad consists of seventeen great players, most of whom are seniors. They have an impenetrable defense and a goal hungry offense, who have accumulated an impressive goal differential of nineteen to five in the six games they have played up to November 19. This years defense may be the strongest ever at SC. The starting defense is Todd Beaver, right fullback; Saul Cartegenia, sweeper; Yori Seeger, stopper and Ivan Wilson left fullback. The team is currently playing in the Watsonville Tournament. In the first game against Aptos, the Cards won 5-1. At halftime the victory was evident and the starting line up was pulled and the entire senior bench finished out the game.

Yearbook. The Cards beat arch rivals Watsonville twice and ran through the league with ease. The Cards had a first round bye at CCS, because of their high seed. In the second round of CCS, the Cards beat Half Moon Bay easily. In the third round against a tough Pioneer high team, the game went into triple overtime and 22 sudden death penalty kicks, before the game was decided in favor of Pioneer.

Roster Valentine Zarate, Saul Cartagenia, Oscar Monroy, Ivan Wilson, Jesus Quintanilla,
David Cooper, Joey Perez, Trinidad Figuera, Jose Montecinos, Ricardo Martinez, Jed Brady, Ian Shragg, Ruben Gonzales, Ryan Baker Chris McCann and Allen Willis. Coach Sergio Sierra.

Sentinel. December 7. SC 5, Aptos 1. After surrendering an early goal to Aptos, the Cards answered in a three minute scoring flurry that netted three scores. Oscar Monroy scored twice and Ruben Gonzales added another to give SC a 3-1 intermission lead in the Watsonville Tournament. “I felt like it was just a matter of time. Our plan was to put the ball on the ground and I think my team is a little more skillful at that,” said coach Sergio Sierra.

Sentinel. December 8. SC 2, North Monterey 1. In the Watsonville Tournament, the Cards didn’t get on the board until the twenty-fifth minute of the second half, when Wes Bare took a pass from Oscar Monroy and went 45 yards to beat the goalie one on one with a nice shot. Then with eight minutes to go, Monroy took a dump from Saul Cartajena on an indirect kick from just outside the box and knocked it through the wall of defenders and past the keeper. “It took us a long time to get things going. But we created a lot of opportunities in the second half,” said Coach Sierra. The Cards move on to semifinal action at a time yet to be announced.

January 11. SC 3, Harbor 1. SC scored in the first minute of the game and never trailed. Harbor tied the game up 16 minutes into the first half. SC scored twice in a span of five minutes toward the end of the first half. The Pirates tightened things up in a scoreless second half.

January 18. SC 5, SLV 0. Muck and cold were no match for SC as the Cards rolled to a 5-0 win over SLV, behind three goals by Wes Bare. Bare got the Cards gong with a goal in the sixth minute and at the thirty-sixth minute Ian Schragg put one in. Bare struck again in the fifty-fifth minute, but it was the heads up play by Ruben Gonzalez that enabled Bare to score. After a SC shot ricocheted off the goal post, Gonzalez heeled the ball backward into a crowd in front of the net and Bare blasted the ball in. “Despite the conditions, we moved the ball really well,” said coach Sergio Sierra, whose team is now 3-1 in league and 9-1-1 overall. “We were more intent on getting into a good rhythm than scoring and it worked out well. Sophomore Oscar Monroy also scored.

January 19. SC 2, Gilroy 1. SC built an insurmountable two goal lead on goals by Oscar Monroy and Ian Schragg to beat Gilroy in the semifinals of the Watsonville Tournament. The tournament has been extended by rain outs. The final of the tournament against Watsonville will not be played until after the two teams meet again in league. SC opened the scoring in the fifteenth minute, when Wes Bare’s throw in bounced over the goal keeper and off the cross bar to Monroy, who knocked it in.
In the sixteenth minute, the Cards struck again. Cesar Onesto, right-side defender, took possession on the defensive end and embarked on a run that split open the defense. Onesto found Jesus Quintanilla, who beat a defender and set up Schragg in front of the net. Gilroy countered seven minutes later, but SC withstood Gilroy’s repeated offensive pushes to preserve the victory. SC plays three games in three days next week before having to week off before having to play Watsonville.

Bare Scores Three For Cardinals In 6-1 Thumping Of Soquel. Wes Bare’s hat trick gave him five goals in two games, as SC won the first two of three games in three days. Bare actually played a part in five goals, assisting on one and drawing a penalty on the other. Soquel scored a fourth minute goal, but SC responded with six of its own, including four in the second half, to improve to 5-1 in league and 12-1-1 overall.
Bare tied the score less than a minute after Soquel’s goal, working a give and go with Joey Perez. He later scored on a penalty kick and was set up by Cesar Onesto’s run from the defensive end in the final minutes. Sophomore Ryan Baker scored the go ahead goal on a penalty kick in the twenty-sixth minute and Jesus Reyes scored in the fiftieth minute. Coach Sierra was livid at halftime at the Cards kickball style of play and told his team to keep the ball on the ground, they did the second half and were rewarded.

January 28. Sentinel Athlete of the Week was senior striker Wes Bare, who scored six goals, including a hat trick, in three SCCAL wins this past week. Bare scored two in a 5-0 win over Aptos, three in a 6-1 thumping of Soquel and another in a 7-0 whitewash of Monte Vista. Against Soquel he assisted on one goal and drew a penalty in the box that led to another. Bare has played varsity all four years, but has been hampered this year by various injuries. But now, Bare is proving that he’s the fastest striker in the SCAL, if not the CCS. Coach Sergio Sierra said, “He’s the heart and soul of the team. He’s a competitor, a fighter and athlete and as Bare goes so go the Cards. Wes is a marked man. But having him as a distraction helps open things up.”

CARDS DOWN WATSONVILLE SC’s Boys Soccer Win Delivers Equal Feelings Of Agony, Elation. The final whistle seemed like it would never arrive. And when it did, its meaning struck the players like a massive blow. SC and Watsonville were locked in a battle for what could decide the SCCAL title. It was a game brimming with tension and pressure, there were rough fouls and big plays, great goals and bad mistakes. And then the whistle blew, signaling a 3-2 SC victory, players on both sides collapsed to the turf. Watsonville in agony, SC in joy. Both in utter disbelief. It wasn’t like the result was a surprise. SC had been on a tear, winning its past four games by a combined score of 23-1.
But to beat Watsonville, a team of champions, in the ultimate game, was something to behold. “It’s an honor to beat Watsonville,” said SC defender Ivan Wilson. For eighth year SC head coach Sergio Sierra, who’s been thinking about giving up the job after this season, it meant justification for the sacrifices and time spent away from his family. But, more than anything, the game should be seen for what it was: one of the greatest in Santa Cruz County history. First half goals by Joey Perez and Wes Bare gave SC a 2-0 first half lead. Watsonville answered with a ball that glanced off the leg of SC defender Todd Beaver for an on goal and a flick header score. Both goals were set up by long throw-ins deep into SC territory to tie the score 2-2. But mere second after the equalizer, Bare rose for a free kick from Perez and headed the ball inside the left post for the winner, only seven minutes before time. Somehow SC scrambled and scratched to hold on in the final minutes.
SC is on track to win the SCCAL title for the first time since 1989-90 season, which is the last time Watsonville failed to win it. The six year Wildcat Dynasty may have ended, but it was also the first time ever in school history, Watsonville has lost two straight league games. Unheralded Soquel shocked Watsonville 1-0 in the Wildcats previous game.
“I’ve been playing varsity for three years to win a league title for Sergio,” Bare said above the din of the SC victory celebration. Midfielder David Cooper said, “All year, he told us we could do it,” SC had a week to prepare for this game and Sierra took the time to convince his team that it, not Watsonville was the team to beat. “Watsonville was coming to our turf and we were in the driver’s seat. Our guys needed to know this was our game, everything was us,” Sierra said. The key was to stay focused. We knew Watsonville was going to come out and hit hard, harder then they usually do. We knew it was coming, but we weren’t prepared when it happened.”
Watsonville out shot SC 9-3 in the second half. Solid goalkeeping by Jose Montesinos, a defender playing in his second game in goal to shore up a weakness at the position, kept the score from becoming even worse. He stopped the Cats top scorer one-on-one and kept his position during Wildcats threatening throw-ins and corner kicks.

February 6. SC 3, Harbor 0. Coach Sergio Sierra said the prospect of a letdown was there after the Cards climactic 3-2 win over Watsonville. In the two practices since, SC spent much of Mondays practice talking about the Watsonville game and all of Tuesday’s kicking the ball around the tennis court, because the girls had possession of the field. “I was hoping not having a true practice would make them hungry. I was right,” Sierra said. Dave Cooper scored an unassisted goal in the first half and Oscor Monroy did the same in the seventy-fourth minute for a 2-0 lead. Wes Bare clinched the victory with two minutes from time on an assist by Ivan Wilson. Saul Cartajena at sweeper and Ryan Baker at stopper provided the teamwork to ward off Harbor and preserve the shutout. SC continues the SCCAL lead at 8-1 and 14-1-1 overall.

February 6. BARE ESSENTIAL. Wes Bare Leads Santa Cruz To Top. At a school as diverse as Santa Cruz and on a team with varied backgrounds, Bare has succeeded in becoming a leader, in breaking down cultural barriers. It was a once in a life time goal. Tie game. Time running short. Wes Bare made eye contact with Santa Cruz High soccer teammate Joey Perez who nodded, almost imperceptibly, and sent a free kick across the penalty box. Enrique Vazquez, a Watsonville defender who doesn’t give up an inch to anybody, was in perfect position–in Bare’s face. But somehow, Bare rose above Vazquez, contorted his body to face the oncoming ball and nailed a header into the lower corner of the goal. Goal, Bare. Win, Santa Cruz.
Bare said later, “It was the biggest game of my life.” But for someone in a game of such magnitude, Bare was composed, relaxed, confident. That’s what sets him apart. Those are the qualities that have earned Bare the confidence of his teammates, the respect of opponents, and the leadership role on a team that appears destined to win its first Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League championship since 1990.
One might believe that of 48 career goals in four years as a varsity starter, Bare had never scored a bigger one. But once-in-a-lifetime has become twice-in-a-lifetime. Bare did the same thing against perennial county power Watsonville two years ago, striking the winner in the final minutes–as a sophomore.
“Wes uses a word that is used in other sports–that is CLUTCH”, Santa Cruz coach Sergio Sierra said. “He says, ‘I’ve got to be a clutch player, but you can only rise to the occasion that’s given to you’. “That means, you can’t be clutch without a team effort.” And no one understands that more than Bare. At a school as diverse as Santa Cruz and on a team with varied backgrounds,
Bare has succeeded in becoming a leader, in breaking down cultural barriers. He believes in his teammates and they believe in him. They believe he won’t panic in front of the net, and he believes his teammates will make the right decisions, whether he gets the ball or not. “Most teams have at least one guy around me,” Bare said. “They tug on my jersey, they know they need to mark me up. But if they have to go double team, it means someone’s open.” Said Sierra,
“Today (in a 3-0 victory over Harbor), he was marked all day long. Wes comes back to the guys and says, “If you go to me, give me the ball at my feet. But if I’m heavily marked, use other avenues.” “I’m thinking, this kid says everything perfectly. He’s aware enough that to win, we may need to get the ball to someone else. And unselfish enough to let his teammates know.” That’s not to say Bare can’t get the job done. On the contrary, he scored three goals as a freshman, 14 as a sophomore, 16 as a junior, and has 15 as a senior, including 12 in the past six games.
In fact, he and classmate Ivan Wilson, a defender, are the only players in school history to start as freshmen. Even at a young age, Sierra noticed Bare’s maturity, and Sierra hasn’t been disappointed. Bare has made the all-league first-team since his sophomore year. The trick is composure, combined with determination. He may not have the best ball skills on the team, but his coach and teammates know that Bare will never emotionally lose control. It’s a trait he’s pick up from his parents, Steve and Jody.
Steve who played football at Western Kentucky under Joe Bugel and Jerry Glanville, coached Wes in baseball, basketball and soccer. “My dad is the biggest influence on me,” Bare said. “He always would get on my case if my effort wasn’t 100 percent. I didn’t like it then, but I appreciate it now.” Bare has taken that mentality to the extreme. He has a 4.0 grade-point average this school year and a 3.6 cumulative GPA. He’s also an outstanding baseball player, as a third baseman, shortstop and pitcher. He’s vice president of the men’s honor society, a school service organization.

February 8. SC 3, Soquel 0. League leading SC was fortunate to win easily, but its lackadaisical style and lack of teamwork during the game had coach Sergio Sierra livid by the end of the game. Of his post-game speech, Sierra said, “I hammered ‘em. I think they got the picture. We needed to be disciplined, we lacked the fire we’ve had in the past three weeks. I take the blame for that,” said Sierra. Jesus Quintanilla scored the first two goals to put the Cards ( 9-1, 15-1-1) up 2-0 at halftime. Ruben Gonzales scored the third score on a pass from Jed Brady. Soquel shocked the league with a win over Watsonville.

February 11. SC 4, SLV 1. SC wins an emotional home finale that capped off the first undefeated home record in coach Sergio Sierra’s tenure. “It was emotional for the seniors, who might have played their last home game,” Sierra said. Oscar Monroy led the SC charge with two goals and Ivan Wilson had a pair of assists. Gizzy Schragg and David Cooper also scored for SC 10-1, 17-1-1. “I’m real confident in my team right now,” Sierra said.

February 13. Cardinals End Title Drought. SC won its first SCCAL title since 1989-90, defeating Aptos 3-0. SC will take a 18-1-1 overall record into tonight’s Watsonville Tournament championship make up game. SC which finished 11-1 in the SCCAL, came out hungry against the Mariners, scoring a goal in the first minute of play. The quick strike came when David Cooper completed a long throw to Ruben Gonzales, who headed the ball in. In the seventeenth minute, Wes Bare sent a free kick to Jed Brady, who headed it in for his first goal of the season. SC led 2-0 at halftime and although everyone on the team played in the second half, the team was intent on preserving the shutout and holding league opponents to single digits in season scoring.
SC allowed only nine goals in SCCAL play. In the second half, SC got their final score, when Bare took a pass from Chris McCann and sped down the left sideline beating everyone, including the goalkeeper to score. “We did it. Today brought back a lot of good memories. It was at the Aptos field in 1990 that we won it in a playoff game. These guys stuck together and worked incredibly hard this year, they really deserve it,” Sierra said.

February 16. Cardinal Boys Nail Down Top Seed In Soccer Playoffs. In one day, SC gained the respect of the finest soccer coaches in the CCS. SC accumulated more points, the method used for playoff seeding purposes, than any other team in CCS, even more the six time Division I Bellarmine, 45 points to 42. Therefore, SC which has the smallest enrollment of the 28 playoff teams is the number one seed in Division II.
“As soon as the meeting was over, coaches were coming over to me to schedule games and asking “how did you beat Watsonville twice?” said coach Sergio Sierra. “I think the soccer tradition here is finally getting thee respect it dearly needs from over the hill. We’ve always been in Watsonville’s shadow, but now its not just Watsonville. Its Watsonville and Santa Cruz. SC 19-1-1 received a first round bye.

February 23. Cardinals Eke Out Win. SC Beats Half Moon Bay 2-1. Perhaps, it says something about the talent on the SC soccer team that it can play poorly and still dominate a playoff opponent. SC score two second half goals and allowed one only, in the final seconds, to beat Half Moon Bay in the CCS Division II quarter-finals at Cabrillo College. “The only good thing that came out of this game is a victory. I’m not satisfied and the team knows that,” said Coach Sergio Sierra.
SC 20-1-1, the top seed abandoned its preferred short passing game by getting caught up in a kick and chase. Sierra know that his team won’t get any further if it resorts to the same dubious tactics in a semifinal match-up with twelfth seeded Pioneer 11-4-7 at West Valley College. It was Pioneer, who ousted SC in last years play-off and went on to win the CCS title. A layoff of one and a half weeks, since its previous game, combined with the nervousness of the playoffs seemed to create too sharp an edge for SC, which seemed to excited to follow a patient game plan. SC controlled much of the play and finished with a 22-9 shot advantage, had a first half chance when Jesus Quintanilla beat two defenders and the goalkeeper, but shot from a poor angle into he side of the netting.
The score was tied 0-0 at halftime and the Cards in turn received a tongue lashing from coach Sierra that lasted the entire halftime. The quality of play improved somewhat in the second half, but it took Wes Bare’s seventeenth goal of the season to kick start SC into action. In the forty-third minute, Half Moon Bay was whistled for a high kick in its own penalty area, giving SC an indirect free kick form 15 yards. In a perfectly executed bit of trickery, Ian Schragg nudged the ball through Ivan Wilson’s legs to Bare, who rifled a left footed shot inside the left post for a 1-0 lead. Bare said, “The goalkeeper looked lost, out of place. And if the wall stayed back on the first touch, I knew I had a good shot at it.” And that’s what happened. SC was halted be four off sides calls in the half, before Bare was in the middle of a sweet passing sequence, that gave observers a glimpse of what real SC soccer is all about. Sweeper Saul Cartajena won the ball and cleared to Bare, who broke open the defense with a pass up the left wing to sophomore Oscar Monroy, creating a two on one break. Monroy centered to Quintanilla, who struck a low shot inside the post to put SC up 2-0 at the sixty-fifth minute.
A long pass bounded off the chest of SC goal keeper Jose Montesinos and right at a opponent for a score. But the final whistle came only seconds after the restart, signaling a SC victory. “Now with the victory, we’ll have a lot of pressure off us. Now, it’s a matter of getting back to what got us here,” said Sierra.

SCCAL ALL LEAGUE Boys Soccer team. The league coaches picked two Cardinals and Coach Sergio Sierra for special awards, which gave SC three of the four awards given out. Wes Bare was chosen Outstanding Forward; Saul Cartajena Outstanding Defender and Coach Sierra Coach of the Year. Out of 16 first team ALL LEAGUE players, SC had five or almost one third of the team. All the SC players are seniors. They are forward, Wes Bare; midfielders, Ruben Gonzales and Ivan Wilson; and defenders, Saul Cartajena and Enrique Vazquez. Honorable mentions were Bryan Baker, David Cooper, Oscar Monroy, Joey Perez and Jesus Quintanilla.

SC High Player Overcomes Odds. The award was for soccer, for being selected the SCCAL Outstanding Defender. But for SC’s Saul Cartajena, the significances was so much greater. He turned his life around. “it’s the first time I’ve ever gotten something like that,” Cartajena said. A year ago Cartajena, en immigrant from El Salvador, wasn’t in school at all. “He was involved in the wrong crowd,” Santa Cruz coach Sergio Sierra said. He came back to school and began the season on a probationary basis, but that was taken off after the dramatic improvement he made. He decided school is his way out.”
Cartajena who is raised by a single mother, lifted his grades above 2.0 and has chosen to spend a fifth-year in high school next year–though he won’t be eligible to play soccer–to graduate and go on to college. “Soccer has always kept him away from trouble,” Sierra said. “That’s why it was so important for him to play this year.” And Cartajena didn’t just play, he excelled, beating out Watsonville standout Enrique Vasquez in a vote by SCCAL coaches. “It’s a great honor,” Cartajena said.
With Cartajena as sweeper, SC allowed a league low nine goals this season. Take away goals scored by Watsonville, the Cards allowed only three combined goals in ten SCCAL matches. “He’s the smartest guy on the field. He makes better decisions than anyone. He know how to read the flow of play,” said SC captain Wes Bare.

JV BOYS SOCCER
Yearbook. Was not as successful as they wanted to be.
Roster: Marco Rivera, Robin Brown, Elliot Kruger, Ben Ow, Sam Crick, Will Lewis, Reynaldo Olivas, Ricardo Torres, Richie Alvarez, John Guerrero, Adrian Albores, Henry Garcia, Tristan Membrez, Tony Pelia, Hugo Diaz, Ramon Duran and Roland Guerrero. Coaches Gannon and Massamori.

GIRLS SOCCER
Practice games: Cupertino won, North Monterey 2-0. Watsonville Tournament: ?
League: Harbor 5-1, Watsonville 3-0, Soquel 3-1, Monte Vista 7-0, 3-1; SLV 0-3. League record 8-4 for second place. In the CCS Division III playoffs SC beat Saratoga 1-0 in double overtime and lost to Mitty 0-3. Over all record 12-6.

Yearbook. The team like the boys was also stacked with tons of talent. The girls were energetic, spirited soccer machines. The team won their way to the CCS playoffs. In the first round game against Saratoga, the regulation game ended in a 0-0 tie. The overtime ended in a tie 0-0. Within the first few minutes of sudden death, SC senior star Ellen Sherrill scored on a beautiful shot in the upper right corner of the goal for the 1-0 win.

Roster: Jessica Hellman, Kaja Shonick, Shannon Griggs, Annie Rentz, Liz Atwood, Cara Shumate, Callie Griggs, Marie McCann, Priya Campbell, Ellen Sherril, Megan Eastman, Allison Marshal, Hillary Brooks and Francine Lynch. Coach Jose Sierra, assistant Jorge Sierra

Sentinel. December 7. SC 2, North Monterey 0. SC improved to 2-0 by beating North Monterey on the strength of two outstanding goals. The first came in the thirty seventh minute, when Priya Campbell crossed to Shannon Griggs, who first-timed the shot into the net. SC strung together about eight pass on the sequence while moving the ball up field quickly from the back. The second goal was scored on a free kick, when Ellen Sherrill scored from nearly 35 yards out to the upper corner.

December 16. SC 5, Harbor 1. Corey Miller’s three goals led the Cards to victory as the SC defense stopped Harbor. Laura Strickland, Adrienne Cramer were noted for their outstanding play as were goalies Ellen Sherrill and Ali Chapin.

January 5. SC 3, Soquel 1. Kara Shumate prevented an upset by scoring two goals and assisting on another. Soquel went ahead 1-0. The Cards 3-1 in league and 6-2 overall slowed their passing game and Shumate, a junior forward went to work. First she set up Ellen Sherrill with the equalizer with about 30 seconds left in the half. Then, five minutes into the second half, she rebounded her own miss for the go ahead score. Later Callie Griggs sent a pass to Shumate who scored from the penalty area for the final goal. “She just took over the game,” said coach Jose Sierra. Defensively, Francine Lynch played well.

January 8. SC 3, Watsonville 0. Shannon Griggs came away with a hat-trick in leading the Cards in their second straight SCCAL win. “She’s been a big part of our offense. We were a little rusty at the start, but got it going,” said coach Jose Sierra. The teams were tied 0-0 at halftime, but Griggs got things going in the second half. She scored an unassisted goal five minutes into the half and found the net again off a rebound shot that made it 2-0 a few minutes later. “The second goal was a real team effort. We were being really aggressive and got several shots off before Shannon put it in.” Griggs scored again at the 25 minute mark off a beautiful corner kick from Marie McCann. Griggs volleyed in the ball for a 3-0 lead. SC at 2-0 has not been scored on in league.

SC 3, Monte Vista 1. Monte Vista put a scare into the first place Cards, who are 5-1, 8-2, turned a 1-1 game at halftime into another SCCAL victory on a slippery field. MVC scored first, taking the lead 27 minutes into the contest on their first shot at goal. SC dominated on defense, but wasted several scoring opportunities of its own. “The girls lacked motivation in the first half,” said coach Jose Sierra, whose team beat MVC 7-0 earlier in the year. “Our offense was not putting it away. We had at least four shots that should have gone in. I think the goal they scored woke us up.” Two minutes after the Mustangs tallied, SC answered back on a goal by Shannon Griggs off a beautiful one-touch pass from Priya Campbell.

Sentinel. February 12. SLV played their best soccer of the year in a key 3-0 victory over second place SC. SC fell to 7-4 and must beat Aptos to clinch a playoff berth as the leagues second place team.

February 16. CCS seeding. The girls CCS tournaments were expanded from two to three divisions for the first time. SC benefits from the extra division. SC, the SCCAL runner up at 11-5 overall, plays against a much weaker field in Division III. SC is seeded tenth and plays seventh seeded Saratoga 8-2-6. The winner faces a difficult match-up against second seeded Mitty.

SC defeated Saratoga in the first round 1-0 in double overtime, but lost to Mitty 0-3. in the second round.

March 4. Second place SC 8-4 was represented by six selections to the SCCAL Girls Soccer Team. Four Cardinals were selected for the ALL SCCAL first team and Francine Lynch was selected the OUTSTANDING DEFENDER. Shannon Griggs was selected OUTSTANDING FORWARD. The first team members were freshman, mid- fielder, Marie McCann; junior, forward, Cara Shumate; sophomore, defender, Kaja Shonick and senior, mid-fielder Ellen Sherrill. Honorable mention were Annie Rentz, Callie Griggs and Priya Campbell.

GIRLS JV SOCCER ended with a 0-9-3 record.
Yearbook. Roster: Sara Dalbesio, Jessica Hellman, Lesley Draper, Mary Ramirez, Ramey Burkes, Ashley Goodwin, Jamyla O’Neill, Clene, Lehver, Jayme Kylburn, Sara Jenssen, Melinda Szilagy, Allin Conant, Amanda Scott, Maricela Ortiz, Charron Conlee and Liz Rubio. Coach Blanca Sierra.

NONE OF THE SPRING SPORTS HAD ANY WRITTEN MATEIAL IN THE YEARBOOK.

BASEBALL
Sentinel preseason write up. Coach Bob Kittle first year. 1996 record: 10-9, 5-7 in league, fourth place tie. Top senior returners were Wes Bare, P/INF; Chuck Lynn, C/DH; Sule Edmonds, 1B/P; Kenyatta Edmonds, OF; Ryan DeLong, CF; Ruben Gonzales, CF. Juniors were Nigel Miller, SS; Chris George, P/2B and Nick Doan P.
Scouting report: SC is going to rely on their pitching staff and team speed. The early parts of Bob Kittle’s first season at the helm have been two musts for winning, hard work and good team chemistry. Wes Bare with a 3-1 record and a 1.79 ERA last year, heads the pool of pitchers that have potential of eating up a lot of innings. SC was the top pitching team in the league last season with a 2.01 team ERA, but hit an anemic .243 clip. Returning pitchers are Chris George, Ryan Delong, Nick Doan and Sule Edmonds can only hope they’ll have more runs to work with. Senior centerfielder Ruben Gonzales hit .333 last year will be a large part of the SC offense. He is joined in the outfield by Kenyatta Edmonds who hit .286. Most of the pitchers will see time in other positions. Bare will play third, George at second base and Doan will patrol the outfield. Chuck Lynn will provide leadership from the catchers spot. Coaches outlook: The kids are practicing their butts off. They are hard working kids and I enjoy that part. Honestly I feel if we don’t win a game, it would still be enjoyable.

February 26. At the Charlie Rose Baseball Classic. SC 6, Monterey 5 in 8 innings. Kenyatta Edmonds drove in the tying run in the top of the seventh and his twin brother Sule scored the winning run in the eighth on a Nigel Miller double to give SC its for win of the season. Chris George went the distance, striking out 11 and giving up just four hits. He settled down after giving up a two run homer in the first inning. SC bats awoke to score three runs in the fifth inning. SC is now 1-2.

April 12. Cards Stuns Wildcats In Baseball 18-10. It was another wild one in the SCCAL, as SC used a 21 hit assault to batter five Watsonville pitchers. “We finally got a lot of two out runs,”, said coach Bob Kittle, who sat the game out after being ejected against Soquel earlier in the week. “Everyone hit the ball great.” Sule Edmonds went 5 for 5 with five RBI’s and scored two runs. All but one SC batter had multiple hits. Chris George survived control problems to go the distance. He walked nine, but tempered that with 11 strike outs and nine hits surrendered. SC improved to 2-5, while Watsonville at 5-2 is a half game behind the league leading Soquel.

Trident, April 17. In a close game the Cards lost to Watsonville 6-5. Adam Karon scored in the first inning and hit a RBI double later in the game to drive in Nigel Miller, who had hit a triple in the second inning. Sule Edmonds brought in two runners in the bottom of the sixth. Nick Doan’s pitching was on fire. Chuck Lynn and Ruben Gonzales were hit by pitches to get on base. Chris George, said “the high points of the game were the team played badly and still almost won the game. The team has good speed and we’re very good when we’re playing well.”
The juniors on the team are Sean Morris, Andy Hoge, John Howell, Chris George, Nigel Miller, Appolo Terry, Nick Doan, Adam Karon, Jeff Cook and Matt Windt. “There is a lot of talent present on this team.” Nigel Miller, the starting shortstop said, “we work hard and have talent to win league.” Confidence is definitely something this years team doesn’t lack. Matt Windt thinks a lot of the team’s strong points come from “talking…the calling off the bench and good communication. We have a fast overall team, good hitting and very good defense. Lots of great athletes.”

Trident, May 15. The team has been an inning behind all season. Their record is 7-14. Their team spirit and enthusiasm are way up there, while their batting averages are a little low and errors per game are high. First baseman Sule Edmonds had this to say about the season, ”It can only get better. The season has been a little disappointing, but that’s okay ‘cause we’re all good friends’ and we all play hard.” Brother Kenyatte plays left field and has been hitting the ball real well. Catcher Chuck Lynn has a gun to throw out runners stealing. Coach Bob Kittle said, “The team has a lot of ability, but we haven’t been able to put it all together, but when they do, everyone better watch out.” The six seniors on the team are Ruben Gonzales, Wes Bare, Chuck Lynn, Kenyatte Edmonds and Sule Edmonds and Ryan Delong.

May 23. Two Cardinals were named to the ALL SCCAL first team. They were junior infielder Nigel Miller, who hit .414 and senior outfielder Kenyatta Edmonds a .354 hitter. Honorable mention were Adam Karon, Nick Doan and Sule Edmonds.

JV BASEBALL (no information)

GIRLS SOFTBALL
Practice games: Hollister 3-10,
League games: Watsonville 5-3,

Sentinel. February 28. Hollister 10, SC 3. SC committed six errors behind starting pitcher Jennifer Cummings in their season opener. Kaite Hintz provided most of the SC offensive punch with an RBI triple in the bottom of the third frame that made the score 6-1. Hintz later scored on a squeeze.

March 28. SC 5, Watsonville 3. SC removed the monkey from their backs with their first victory of the season in league play. April Nisperos scattered six hits and kept the Wildcats bats off balance to pick up the win. SC is 1-1 in league and 1-11 overall. Two Card errors let two runs in the second inning. SC broke out for four runs in the fifth inning aided by two Cat errors, and RBI hits by Alicia Flores and Erin Hichman.

Trident, May 15. Varsity Girls Softball Team Having A Ball Through A Shaky Season. With only five returning players, younger players were needed, they are freshman second baseman Page Nutt. three sophomores. outfielder Alyssia Piffero, first baseman Emily Caviglia, pitcher April Nisperos, and junior outfielder Crystal Geiger. Returning are juniors: catcher Kara Hallam, shortstop Katie Hintz, outfielder Erin Hichman. And senior outfielders Karl Valdez and Alicia Flores and pitcher Jennifer Cummings last years SCCAL MVP.
“This years team had the closest friendships, which definitely made it worth playing,” said Cummings. This transitional season was hindered by Cummings shoulder injury, which made pitching for Cummings a rarity. She has received a full ride scholarship to the University of Wisconsin, whose program is only two years old, but has a .500 winning percentage to start. Stepping into Cummings shoes was third baseman April Nisperos. “The teams support was great. Our defense helped me out a lot. So, stepping in for Jen wasn’t that hard.” “April pitched great all season,” remarked catcher Kara Hallam. “Our season was scary at first. You never know what the season is going to be like with a whole new infield. We came together, fought it out and won a couple of games along the way.” With two games to go the team is 3-5 in league.

JV GIRLS SOFTBALL (no information)

TRACK BOYS
Trident, April 17. List by main event, year in school and name:
Sprints: seniors, Jesus Quintanilla, Tyler Masanori, Jason Cardoza, Collin Arlt and Boris Quintanilla. Sophomore Mike Cincola and Freshman Will Lewis.
Hurdles: Sophomore Sam Crick
Distance events: Sophomores Chris Newey and Torrey Smith. Freshman Daniel Graybill.
Field events: Seniors Lee Martin, Brandon Williams, Travis Rowland and Jeff Truhitte.
Almost all of the above do other events as well.

The lack of numbers effects the dual meet result as what happened with a loss to Harbor 64-58

Trident, May 15. At the SLV meet senior Lee Martin set a personal record, by hurling the discus farther than he ever had before at 129‘2“. Seniors on the team were Lee Martin, Travis Rowland, Jeff Truhitte, Brandon Williams, Colin Arlt, Raul Clemens, Clay Tol, Jason Cardoza, Tyle Masamori and Jesus Quintanilla. The seniors are three fourths of the team.

TRACK GIRLS
Trident, April 17. So what if Aptos has 135 people on their track team? Who’s trying harder? who’s having more fun? And who features every member of the team in their newspaper? You guessed it, its your own Cardinal track team.

List by main event, year in school and name:
Sprints: Senior Michelle Williams. Juniors: Francine Lynch and Josie Sproule. Sophomore, Marie McCann.
Hurdles: Senior Heidi Brockman
Distance events: Seniors Bridgette Connerly and Jenny Croghan
Field events: Senior: Nicole Jackson. Juniors: Cori Tom and Megan Eastman. Freshman Porsha Wallace.
Almost all of the above do other events as well.

The lack of numbers effects the dual meet result as what happened with a loss to Harbor 69-56

Trident, May 15. A week later, at Soquel, junior sprint star Francine Lynch won the 100 meters and the 200 meters in fantastic times. Michelle Wilson has a personal best 15 feet in the long jump against Aptos. Seniors on the team were Bridgette Connerly, Jenny Croghan, Heidi Brockman, Michelle Wilson and Nicole Jackson.

BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING
Trident, May 15. The members of the boys varsity team is listed, their events, their best times, plus those who qualified for CCS.
Varsity Boys
Steve Kele: 100 in 107.73 and 100 fly
Sean Echols: 100 fly
Peter Whitney: 500 free, 100 free, 50 backstroke, and 200 medley relay
Forest Myatt and Lloyd Mueller 50 free and 100 free
Raul Clemens 199.7 points in diving

Members of the JV Boys: Royce Perez, Jesse Cordero, Cory Atkins. Matt Foster, Carlos Perez, Marlin Henton, Joe Blanco, Tim Daley, Gregor McNab and Brad Jones.
The team had a good season beating Watsonville, Monte Vista and Soquel.

SWIMMING AND DIVING GIRLS
The Girls defeated Monte Vista and Watsonville and lost to Harbor, Soquel and Aptos for a 2-3 league record. The season has been challenging with the small size of the squad.

Trident, May 15. The members of the girls varsity team is listed, their events, their best times, plus those who qualified for CCS.
Varsity Girls
200 Medley Relay: Corey Miller, Diana Willis, Molly Devine and Ashley Adams in 2:.09.99 a qualifying time for CCS
200 free: Corey Miller in 2:10.47; Ashley Adams in 2:25.65; Eirin Baires in 2:30.95; Emilie Powell in 2:31.80
200 Individual Medley: Diana Willis in 2:41.67; Clarissa Moore in 2:50.99
50 free: Corey Miller in 27 flat; Ashley Adams in 29.16; Adrienne Cramer in 29.30; Laura Strickland in 30.31; Jamie Langley in 31.65
100 fly: Molly Devine in 1:26.56; Diana Willis in 1:27.25; Laura Strickland in 1:28.04 and Amelia Mitcal in 1:33.36
100 free: Corey Miller in 59.31; Clarissa Moore in 1:04.90
500 free: Eirin Bairse in 5.45; Shana Barton in 7:23; Kate Semas in 6:42.46
200 free relay: Diana Willis, Ashley Adams, Adrienne Cramer and Corey Miller in 1:55.11 a qualifying time for CCS
100 backstroke: Corey Miller in 1:05.58, Molly Devine in 1:20.06, Emilie Powell in 1:21.33, Jamie Langley in 1:27.43
100 Breaststroke: Diana Willis in 1:18.76 and Laura Beach in 1:19.95.

Members of the JV Girls: Molly Martin, Brandi Richards, Katy Overbeck, Brigitte Christiensen, Amanda Ballard, Michelle Overbeck, Nicole Hanks, Saori Anon, Elka Easter, Heather Lewis, Shaney Cresione, Lucretia Miguel and Kristen Young.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Matches: Monterey 0-3, Seaside 3-0; SLV 2-3, Harbor 1-3, Mount Madonna 3-1. Record as of May 1 is 1-8.

Sentinel preseason write up. Coach Bill Hoffman first year. Last years record 6-10 for sixth place. Key junior players: Dan Terry, Middle blocker, 6-6; Colin Radich, server, 5-7; Tyler Thatcher, outside hitter, 6-0. Sophomore, outside hitter, 6-0, Eli Wilson.
Outlook: No doubt the Cards have talent. But against deeper more experience teams like SLV and Harbor, the going could get tough. SC battled SLV last week, but eventually SLV wore the Cards down and won in four. Terry, who played for Team SC this off season was last years SCCAL Sophomore of the Year and should be one of the leagues best middles this season. They may pull an upset or two, but SC may be the odd team out come CCS time.

Sentinel. Monterey defeated SC 15-12, 16-14, 15-10. SC was ahead in the second game by six points, but couldn’t finish the game off. SC is 0-2 in league.

Sentinel March 7. SC defeated Seaside 15-13, 15-4, 15-5, but lost its number two hitter, Gabe Cutuli to an ankle injury in the first game. Norvell pocketed a match high 14 kills for SC, which improved to 3-4 in league.

Sentinel. March 8. SLV Survives In Five. It started out as a SLV blowout, but ended nearly blowing up in the Cougars faces. It took SLV five games to defeat SC 15-3, 15-11, 2-15, 11-13, 15-8. Jonathan Norvell brought back SC’s offense in the third game and turned around the match with some of the best hits in the match. SC has some punch, without a doubt, said the SLV coach.

Sentinel April 5. Harbor defeated SC in four games, 16-14, 7-15, 15-2, 15-4. SC squandered a 14-11 lead in the first game, then self-destructed with poor passing as Harbor prevailed. Jonathan Norvell paced SC with 16 kills. Dan Terry added nine. SC is 3-6 in league.

Trident, April 17. The original coach left the country and it took time to find a new coach, so the team lost out on three weeks of practice. With only a few hard hitters, including outside hitters Tyler Thatcher and Eli Wilson and 6-7 middle blocker Dan Terry, SC depends on its scrappy defense, which is led by setter and team captain, Colin Radich and senior Ivan Wilson.

Sentinel. May 1. Santa Cruz Earns First Win Of Season by defeating Mount Madonna 15-11. 11-15, 15-10, 15-10. “The kids finally had fun out there, they were weren’t worried about anything and just went out and played hard,” said coach Bill Hoffman. SC now 1-8 got solid efforts from Eli Wilson, who had 12 kills and served a great game. Dan Terry had 19 kills and four blocks and senior Ivan Wilson played a great all around game and served as an emotional leader.

BOYS TENNIS
Practice record 0-4.
league record 4-6 for fourth place.

Sentinel. May 1. A TALENT FOR TENNIS. But Coren Has Priorities In Order At SCHS. On paper, Gabe Coren has all the makings of a tennis brat. Junior tournaments at age 9. Northern California junior zone teams at the 12, 14, and 16 age brackets. Playing and winning tournaments up and down the state. Playing nationally in Nashville, Tenn., and internationally in Vladivostok, Russia. Boys indoor nationals in Chicago and outdoors in Boston.
Coren doesn’t practice with his teammates at Santa Cruz High. He practices with a former player from UC Santa Cruz. On paper, Coren is all junior achievement. But in real life, the trend doesn‘t pan out. Talk to the kid–and his father–and they’ll tell you the only paper Gabe Coren is after will have a university president‘s signature on it. And if the kid can play some tennis while he‘s getting that degree, then what the heck.
Meet the Cornes, purveyors of an alarming brand of common sense: They main thing is I just want to keep playing. I want to go to college,” said Gabe Coren, Santa Cruz High junior. “Some guys play one year, then leave, but I want to play all the way through.” “I would love to see him get a college education out of it,” said Ian Coren, graduate of Penn State University. “He deserves it. He works hard at it. He practices every day. “I try to stay balanced about it. I figure if it wasn’t tennis, it would be piano or saxophone.”

Helping keep Coren in balance is the Santa Cruz tennis team. It went 4-6 this year. There are two juniors, eight sophomores and three freshmen. As the fourth-place team, the Cardinals sent Coren, No. 2 singles player Sam Martisius and two doubles teams into the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League tournament, which began Wednesday. Coren won his first match yesterday morning, defeating Brian Corbett of San Lorenzo Valley 6-2, 6-0. Later he beat Nick Clock of Aptos 6-2, 6-1. Today he plays Ra-Te Birhan of Soquel for the singles title at 3 p.m. at the Seascape Sports Club in Aptos. He won the league singles title last year, went 9-1 in league play and was unbeaten in singles play this year, 14-0 in total dual matches. He is friends with Martisius, but practices at UCSC to stay sharp.
“There is a certain lack of team cohesion with Gabe not practicing with us,” said coach Ned Worthington. “But tennis is an individual sport, and it’s good for everyone in the league to have Gabe playing in the league. Some of these guys have never had the opportunity to see anyone that good.” Coren is held in high stature in local prep tennis circles, but is easily overlooked outside that world. At 5-11 and 130 or so pounds, he is not an imposing figure. Yet he is a hard-hitting baseline player and a tenacious competitor.
When he was 9, he attended a tennis camp headed by UCSC men’s tennis coach Bob Hansen. Hansen realized he had a special talent, and helped Coren make the jump to junior competition. Helping Coren ease into the high-population world of public education was longtime Santa Cruz High tennis coach Dennis Mullen. Coren was the only freshman on the team. He went 7-3 that first year, and came back to beat every player who defeated him. Coren still seeks out Mullen for counsel.
Though Worthington is the third Santa Cruz coach in three years, Mullen has helped player and new coach make the transition to Coren’s unique method of team participation. But to eyes jaded by the seeming hordes of junior players staking out delusions of professional paydays, Gabe Coren appears to have things in order. Refreshingly so. “I try to balance things, I like other sports,” Coren said. “I know I couldn’t go to the caliber of a top 10 D-1 (Division I) school, but I think I can go somewhere good.

Trident, April 17. The team is off to a somewhat rough start with a 0-4 record in non league play. The league format is to have five singles players and two doubles team. Listed by the teams ladder in order from one to five. Number one, junior Gabe Coren; 2. Junior Sam Martisius; 3. Sophomore Ian Foulkes; 4. Sophomore Jeff Garon; 5. Sophomore Stuart Abel. The doubles prospects are sophomores: Ben Schenini, Justin Reyes, Mike Croghan and Matt Bianhini. Freshman Peter Whitney, Ryan Craig and Josh Whitman. The new coach is a teacher at Soquel Ned Worthington, who has been coaching and playing tennis for over 30 years.

Trident, May 15. This years team complied a record of 4-6. The final lineup for the Cards was: 1. Gabe Coren; 2. Sam Martisius; 3. Ian Foulkes; 4. Jeff Garon; 5. Stuart Abel. Doubles teams were taken from the following: Ben Sheinin, Peter Whitney, Justin Reyes, Mike Croghan, Ryan Craig, Josh Whitman and Matt Bianchini. Gabe Coren won his second straight SCCAL singles title. In team matches he was 14-0 and didn’t even drop a single set all year.

Gabe Coren will represent the SCCAL at the CCS individual playoffs.

GOLF
Trident, May 15. One of the few bright spots this season has been the one-two punch of the Weintraub brothers. Senior Eli’s booming drives have shocked many an onlooker, while freshman superstar Isaac’s “Ike” precise puts have dropped many a jaw in disbelief. Although the team has yet to win a match, this has nothing to do with the Weintraub brothers. Teams like last years co-champions Monte Vista and Harbor have 35 people trying out for the team, while SC is lucky to assemble six guys who want to play to form a team. Last years fifth place team left only two player, Eli Weintraub and Ryan Deane, to provide leadership to a badly inexperience team.

SURFING
Sentinel. January 30. BACK IN SESSION. Interscholastic Surfing Returns To County After A three Year Hiatus. Former SC surfers would say, “When we were at SCHS there was a surfing team and we would compete against all the other schools and we always won the trophy. It was cool, too bad they don’t have it anymore.” Niall McNamara, a Santa Cruz junior, could only imagine talking to the lineup at his home break, Steamer Lane, and having it considered as he’s known it to be for many years–an educational experience. Until now. Interscholastic surfing has returned to Santa Cruz County for the first time in three years, and McNamara and the droves of other high school-aged surfers in the area are, in a word, stoked. “I think it’s a great thing for us,” said McNamara. “It’s enabling us to do something for our school that we are doing all the time anyways.” It’s also placing activities like carving down the face at Steamer, right up there with carving up a face in fifth period woodshop on the school activity scale. And in a community billed largely as “Surf City North” that has a strong economic base in the surfing industry, ‘why not?’ most are asking. “We decided that our kids deserve recognition for their sport just like any other kids do,” said Dori Arthur, who teaches at Soquel High and helped initiate the idea back in 1987. “It takes a lot of practice and hard work to be a good surfer and these kids are great athletes. But no one seems to want to recognize them the same way football or basketball players get recognized. Surfers still seem to get the ‘dumb, long-haired hoodlum’ stereotype attached to them, and that’s sad.” Those who got the Santa Cruz Surf League going strong through late 80s and kept it going into the early 90s, never quite saw it evolve into a SCCAL sport. Which is to say, surfing never got past club status. With mass enthusiasm from the kids, donations of time and money from local surf clubs and plenty of blood, sweat and tears from the coaches who ultimately kept it afloat, the surf league saw its heyday in the early 90s. For a brief moment it looked like local surfers might soon be able to sport a varsity letter on their back, just as any other athlete at their school. Then just as quickly as it had risen, the league’s chairman retired, and the league soon folded. “It went really strong for a number of years,” said Frosty Hesson, Soquel High’s original coach. “But as surfing tends to do, the interest will fade away after a while.” Which begs this question: why in an area equally inundated with those who surf for labor, leisure and pure passion hasn’t surfing received equal support as a character-building, discipline-oriented activity that requires mental strength and pure athleticism? “I don’t know really,” admits Marty Weeland, former surfing coach at Aptos High School. “I guess because of all the bureaucracy and red tape. If we could
have pushed it through and got county and district-wide support, I think the overall interest of kids would’ve been tenfold.” As it stands now, the surf teams get no financial backing from their schools. Judges are volunteers from the surfing community, jerseys and prizes are donated by surf shops and other businesses in the area and insurance in provided through Boy Scouts of America. Either way, the league is back and the numbers are stronger than ever. Santa Cruz, Harbor, Soquel and Aptos currently make up the league, although local kids who are being home-schooled or go over the hill to schools like Bellarmine are not being denied. San Lorenzo Valley had a team the first go-around, and league rep Ryan Buel thinks SLV will join in again next season. Each team has regular meetings with a coach on campus and on the beach. Contests have already been held at Steamer Lane and the Hook this season, with boys and girls varsity and long board divisions. One marked change this time around has been the number of females involved. “There’s just more girls getting into it,” said Pam Pitts, who surfs for Santa Cruz although she gets schooled at home. “My older sisters were in it (the league) a long time ago, and they had to go against short board guys. It’s really good to see a lot more girls getting involved.” And guys like Santa Cruz’s McNamara and Stefan Wolizcko say they’ll by happy to see the day when surfing gets its due as a real sport. “I want to see it become a real sport at our school,” said Wolizcko, a junior whose brother was a star basketball player at Santa Cruz before moving on to West Valley and UOP. “We’ve got our little school rivalries going, we have a regular practice schedule and this is helping us become better at competing in our sport.” The real sport of surfing.

INDIVIDUALS

It Was Miller Time In ‘97 For SC Girls. Nobody can blame Corey Miller for dwelling in the past a little. As promising as the SC water polo player’s future looks, she doesn’t mind reflecting on her senior season and the things that were important to her. “Our team was really special. We were close friends and bonded well. I was happy with the way things went,” said Miller. Miller capped of a sensational season by being voted the SCCAL MVP, and heading an ALL LEAGUE team that has college scouts drooling. Miller who’s headed to Cal or Stanford was a strong link on a SC team that advanced to the CCS quarterfinals, before losing to eventual champions Menlo 8-3.
Three Cards were named to the first team and SC coach Aubrey Miller, Corey’s father earned COACH OF THE YEAR honors in his second season. Cory Miller, who scored eight goals in her first game of the year, said her highlight had little to do with personal achievement. “Numbers and scoring aren’t really that important to me. I am playing because I love it. I’d much rather give a teammate a pass the makes everyone, ‘ooohhh’ and ‘ahhh’ than score a goal, said Miller. Her coach agreed. “She played extremely well with the other girls,” he said. Aubrey Miller, also serves as the UCSC women’s coach, said the success that this year’s area teams generated will do wonders for local exposure. There are plans to bring an off season program for local prep players in the area.

Theodosis Given Nod From Coaches. A natural progression toward greatness seemed to be inevitable for Nick Theodosis. So being named the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League’s most valuable player this season does not at all seem surprising. Early on in his career, honors dotted the resume of the star point guard for Santa Cruz High School. It started in 1995 when he was named All-County sophomore of the year, scoring 14.5 points per game and earning second-team all-league honors. His encore the following year included leading the league in scoring at 17.3 points per game. He was named All-County junior of the year, earning first-team all-league honors and setting himself up for a spectacular senior season. But admittedly, his final season at Santa Cruz started with a loud thud. The Cardinals lost five of their first nine games and Theodosis spent much of the time on the bench. Battling some personal problems and trying to find equal ground with SC coach Pete Newell, Theodosis eventually left the team for a brief tine. “There were things off the court I was going through and it carried over the basketball,” Theodosis said. “Coach and I straightened things out, though. We put things behind us a long time ago.” Once at 9-7, the Cardinals finished the season on a 14-2 clip (including 11-1 in the SCCAL) and Theodosis was a huge reason behind the resurgence. Santa Cruz is the only local team still alive in the Central Coast Section playoffs (they play undefeated Hillsdale on Wednesday in the Division III semi finals). “I’m pleased that he was recognized for what he is–the best player in the league,” said Newell, who gushes over his point guard’s leadership. “Certainly he is our most valuable player. He’s been able to stay focused and that’s the key.” Theodosis, who averaged 14.7 points per game this year, could not say he was surprised at his honor but didn’t think he should have won it.

Soji Howe is named after civil rights leader Sojouner Truth. Soji Howe could have coasted through the off season. Her team had won two straight league titles. She was a third team all league selection. As one of the two returning seniors, she was assured of being a big wheel on a road tested machine. But she also felt the usual wouldn’t take her where she wanted to go. So over the summer, Soji Howe took her game where it had never gone before–to the West Field House at UC Santa Cruz to play in men’s pickup games. Last year she played center for Santa Cruz High. At 5-feet-9 inches, she would not play center in a men’s pickup game. And that was the point. Howe knew she would play small forward this season and knew a summer of games at the West Field House against men would break her of a center’s habits. “I was one of the smallest players, so it forced me to improve my outside game,” she said. “It was fun. They don’t expect you to do anything good, so when you do–swat a shot or hit a jumper–it’s kind of a shock.” On paper it may sound brash. Or unusual. To Howe it is neither. She wasn’t out to prove anything. There were skills she needed to improve, and playing in pickup games with men would provide a crash course. Sojourner Howe is bright, self-effacing, and always talks team. The real clue regarding her nature can be found in her name. It comes from the past, from a black woman who, in the 1850’s traveled the East and Midwest and spoke out eloquently and forcefully against slavery. Sojourner Truth preached a gospel of concern for others. Soji Howe, 17, an only child raised by a single parent, is anything but a troubled loner. “Soji is very, very unselfish. She never complains about not getting enough minutes, she never complains about not getting enough shots,” said Santa Cruz Coach Silviano Gaona. “As long as the team is winning, she doesn’t care.” The Cardinals won 20 games last season and went 12-0 in the Santa Cruz Athletic League. But with two time SCCAL Player of the Year Kelly Kaiser and first-team all leaguer Natalie Gibbons graduating, Gaona knew adjustments had to be made. Moving Howe from center to small forward definitely qualified as an adjustment. So far, the move has paid off. The Cardinals take an 11-2 record into league play and have defined themselves as the team to beat. The move worked and not because Howe spent a lot of time on her own playing against men and boys. The team stuck together in the off season, most of them
played in summer leagues and made a trip together to San Diego. “Our whole team stays together and there’s not really much drop off from first to second teams,” said Howe. “Our third team is good.” Gaona throws at least 10 players per game at the opposition, revolving players onto the floor to fuel a pressure defense. This year, more than last, more players are scrambling for longer periods of time. A team requires a certain chemistry to pull it off. If would be unthinkable on the pro level, and is becoming increasingly rare on the collegiate level. But in Howe, Gaona found an unselfish conduit, one that absorbs energy and has the rare capacity to spread it around. Howe is plenty human, though. She contemplates what might be in store for herself when finished with high school. But even in self-examination she remains somehow rooted in common sense. Sure, she comes from a championship program. Sure, she probably will be high on the all-league list. But college recruiters aren’t banging on her door, and may not. The Solution? Simple, for now. Instead of walking on a Division I school in hopes of, first, making the team, they clinging to a spot on the bench, Howe says she hopes to attend a Division III school featuring a strong academic program and a need for women basketball players. “I would rather play on a team, than sit on a team,” is her current statement regarding her future in basketball. But now is a good place to be. Her team is hot, she’s playing well, and the coach is happy. “Soji worked harder than any player on our team in the off season, and she didn’t have to,” said Gaona. “She’s so smart, and will play whatever you tell her. Every coach dreams of having six or seven players like her.”

SC High Player Overcomes Odds. The award was for soccer, for being selected the SCCAL Outstanding Defender. But for SC’s Saul Cartajena, the significances was so much greater. He turned his life around. “it’s the first time I’ve ever gotten something like that,” Cartajena said. A year ago Cartajena, en immigrant from El Salvador, wasn’t in school at all. “He was involved in the wrong crowd,” Santa Cruz coach Sergio Sierra said. He came back to school and began the season on a probationary basis, but that was taken off after the dramatic improvement he made. He decided school is his way out.” Cartajena who is raised by a single mother, lifted his grades above 2.0 and has chosen to spend a fifth-year in high school next year–though he won’t be eligible to play soccer–to graduate and go on to college. “Soccer has always kept him away from trouble,” Sierra said. “That’s why it was so important for him to play this year.” And Cartajena didn’t just play, he excelled, beating out Watsonville standout Enrique Vasquez in a vote by SCCAL coaches. “It’s a great honor,” Cartajena said. With Cartajena as sweeper, SC allowed a league low nine goals this season. Take away goals scored by Watsonville, the Cards allowed only three combined goals in ten SCCAL matches. “He’s the smartest guy on the field. He makes better decisions than anyone. He know how to read the flow of play,” said SC captain Wes Bare.

Theodosis Given Nod From Coaches. A natural progression toward greatness seemed to be inevitable for Nick Theodosis. So being named the Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League’s most valuable player this season does not at all seem surprising. Early on in his career, honors dotted the resume of the star point guard for Santa Cruz High School. It started in 1995 when he was named All-County sophomore of the year, scoring 14.5 points per game and earning second-team all-league honors. His encore the following year included leading the league in scoring at 17.3 points per game. He was named All-County junior of the year, earning first-team all-league honors and setting himself up for a spectacular senior season. But admittedly, his final season at Santa Cruz started with a loud thud. The Cardinals lost five of their first nine games and Theodosis spent much of the time on the bench. Battling some personal problems and trying to find equal ground with SC coach Pete Newell, Theodosis eventually left the team for a brief tine. “There were things off the court I was going through and it carried over the basketball,” Theodosis said. “Coach and I straightened things out, though. We put things behind us a long time ago.” Once at 9-7, the Cardinals finished the season on a 14-2 clip (including 11-1 in the SCCAL) and Theodosis was a huge reason behind the resurgence. Santa Cruz is the only local team still alive in the Central Coast Section playoffs (they play undefeated Hillsdale on Wednesday in the Division III semi finals). “I’m pleased that he was recognized for what he is–the best player in the league,” said Newell, who gushes over his point guard’s leadership. “Certainly he is our most valuable player. He’s been able to stay focused and that’s the key.” Theodosis, who averaged 14.7 points per game this year, could not say he was surprised at his honor but didn’t think he should have won it.

But Coren Has Priorities In Order At SCHS. On paper, Gabe Coren has all the makings of a tennis brat. Junior tournaments at age 9. Northern California junior zone teams at the 12, 14, and 16 age brackets. Playing and winning tournaments up and down the state. Playing nationally in Nashville, Tenn., and internationally in Vladivostok, Russia. Boys indoor nationals in Chicago and outdoors in Boston. Coren doesn’t practice with his teammates at Santa Cruz High. He practices with a former player from UC Santa Cruz. On paper, Coren is all junior achievement. But in real life, the trend doesn‘t pan out. Talk to the kid–and his father–and they’ll tell you the only paper Gabe Coren is after will have a university president‘s signature on it. And if the kid can play some tennis while he‘s getting that degree, then what the heck. Meet the Cornes, purveyors of an alarming brand of common sense: They main thing is I just want to keep playing. I want to go to college,” said Gabe Coren, Santa Cruz High junior. “Some guys play one year, then leave, but I want to play all the way through.” “I would love to see him get a college education out of it,” said Ian Coren, graduate of Penn State University. “He deserves it. He works hard at it. He practices every day. “I try to stay balanced about it. I figure if it wasn’t tennis, it would be piano or saxophone.”

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